Turkish Studies Symposium 2015

Ninth Annual Transatlantic Security & Turkish Studies Symposium 2015

Turkish Foreign Policy – Challenges and Opportunities 

Turkey-ForeignPolicy

Symposium Flyer

 

Friday, April 3, 2015
8:15 am – 5:00 pm

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
2025A SDRP Ikenberry
2nd Floor

301 E. Gregory Dr.
Champaign, IL 61820 (map)

Organized by:
European Union Center
The Program in Arms Control, Disarmament, and International Security

Co-sponsored by:
Russian, East European and Eurasian Center (REEEC)
Center for Global Studies (CGS)
Center for South Asian & Middle Eastern Studies (CSAMES)

EUC, REEEC, and CGS are National Resource Centers funded by the US Department of Education Title VI grant. EUC is also an European Union Center of Excellence funded by the European Union.

 

About the Symposium

Turkey-ForeignPolicy2

 

Turkish foreign policy has long been considered to be either synonymous with or at least heavily influenced by the foreign policy of its Western allies.  Although its position in NATO and its relationship with both the United States and the member states of the European Union remains an important component of Turkish foreign policy, domestic and regional factors are now playing an increasingly important role in what Turkey does and how it sees itself.  This symposium examines the challenges and opportunities facing Turkish foreign policy-makers in the ever-evolving Middle East/North African region.  The presenters cover a wide range of topics, including include Turkey and the EU, Turkey and NATO, Turkey and the Prospects of a Middle Eastern Nuclear Weapons Free Zone, Turkey and the Syrian Refugee Crisis.  Also presented is an investigation of domestic determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy, the effect of Desecularization on Turkish Foreign Policy-Making, and Turkey’s role in combating Islamic Extremism.

 

Schedule [.pdf]

Morning Session – Turkish Foreign Policy: A Local Perspective

8:15-8:30 AM

Welcome
Drs. Edward Kolodziej, CGS Director and Interim ACDIS Director, and Anna Stenport, Director of the EUC, UIUC
8:30-9:15 AM

Çiğdem Benam, Boston College
“Opening Up the Turkish ‘Black Box’: Domestic Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy”

9:15-10:00 AM

Can Kasapoğlu, Center for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies
“The Syrian Civil War and Turkey’s Tough Choices: Ankara Facing the New Regional Security Environment”

10:00-10:30 AM
Coffee Break
10:30-11:15 AM

Kemal Kirişçi, Brookings Institution
“Syrian Refugees in Turkey: Why Were They Welcomed by the Turkish State?”

11:15 AM-12:00 PM

Ayhan Kaya, Istanbul Bilgi University
“Desecularization of the State and Society in Turkey and Its Impact on Turkish Foreign Policy: Islamization and Ottomanization”

 

Afternoon Session – Turkish Foreign Policy: A Regional/Global Perspective
1:30-2:15 PM

Bilgin Ayata, Freie Universität Berlin
“From Blessing to Curse? The Arab Uprisings and Its Implications on Turkish Foreign Policy”

2:15-3:00 PM

Ömer Taşpınar, Brookings Institution
“Turkey-EU Relations: Still Relevant?”

3:00-3:30 PM
Coffee Break
3:30-4:14 PM

Nilsu Gören,University of Maryland
“Extended Deterrence and Tactical Nuclear Weapons: The Turkish Case”

4:15-5:00 PM

Kemal Sılay, Indiana University
“A Political and Military Predicament: The Escalating Danger of Islamism in Turkey and Discourses against Its NATO Membership”

5:00-6:00 PM
Reception
6:00-8:00 PM
Dinner for participants and invited guests

 

Speakers

Bilgin Ayata, Freie Universität Berlin
“From Blessing to Curse? The Arab Uprising and Its Implications on Turkish Foreign Policy”

 

Çiğdem Benam, Boston College
“Opening Up the Turkish ‘black box’: Domestic Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy”

 

Nilsu Gören, University of Maryland
“Extended Deterrence and Tactical Nuclear Weapons: The Turkish Case”

 

Ayhan Kaya, Bilgi University
“Desecularization of the State and Society in Turkey and Its Impact on Turkish Foreign Policy: Islamization and Ottomanization”

 

Can Kasapoğlu, Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies
“The Syrian Civil War and Turkey’s Tough Choices: Ankara Facing the New Regional Security Environment”

 

Kemal Kirişçi, Brookings Institution
“Syrian Refugees in Turkey: Why Were They Welcomed by the Turkish State?”

 

Kemal Sılay, Indiana University
“A Political and Military Predicament: The Escalating Danger of Islamism in Turkey and Discourses against Its NATO Membership”

 

Ömer Taşpınar, Brookings Institution
“Turkey-EU Relations: Still Relevant?”

 

Abstracts

Bilgin Ayata, “From Blessing to Curse? The Arab Uprising and Its Implications on Turkish Foreign Policy
Çiğdem Benam, “Opening Up the Turkish ‘black box’: Domestic Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy
Nilsu Gören, “Extended Deterrence and Tactical Nuclear Weapons: The Turkish Case
Ayhan Kaya, “Desecularization of the State and Society in Turkey and Its Impact on Turkish Foreign Policy: Islamization and Ottomanization
Can Kasapoğlu, “The Syrian Civil War and Turkey’s Tough Choices: Ankara Facing the New Regional Security Environment
Kemal Kirişçi, “Syrian Refugees in Turkey: Why Were They Welcomed by the Turkish State?
Kemal Sılay, “A Political and Military Predicament: The Escalating Danger of Islamism in Turkey and Discourses against Its NATO Membership
Ömer Taşpınar, “Turkey-EU Relations: Still Relevant?

 

Bilgin Ayata, Freie Universität Berlin

From Blessing to Curse? The Arab Uprising and Its Implications on Turkish Foreign Policy”

The outbreak of mass protests and ensuing regime changes in the Middle East presented a critical opportunity for Turkey to show if it indeed can live up to its aspired regional leadership. Today, the worldwide euphoria about the popular protests have long subsided and are replaced by concerns about displacement, civil unrest, war, societal polarization and violent instability in the affected countries. In the meantime, Turkey’s foreign policy has undergone a conflicting path in the past four years in light of the rapid changes and challenges in the region. The paper will assess the implications of the Arab uprisings on the foreign policy of the “new Turkey” who is competing with other powerful actors to influence the political remapping of the Middle East. By exploring both Turkey’s rhetoric and actions towards the Arab uprisings and by considering both domestic and regional factors in its responses to ongoing crisis, three developments such as the Kurdish empowerment in Syria, the ouster of Morsi and domestic pressures will be highlighted as critical moments that have put constraints on Turkey’s regional ambitions. While clear cut conclusions are difficult to draw amid ongoing conflict and crisis in the region, the paper argues that the Arab uprisings facilitated Turkey’s repositioning in the Arab world as a more independent, yet also more controversial actor who requires new allies to implement its vision for a ‘Post-Camp David Order’ in the Middle East.

 

Çiğdem Benam, Boston College

“Opening Up the Turkish ‘black box’: Domestic Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy”

Over the last decades Turkish politics and society have gone through enormous transformation. Increased pace of globalization combined with the Justice and Development Party (AKP)’s rise to power in 2002, an actor seen as a contender of main ideology of the Turkish state, made domestic and international become increasingly intertwined. In search of legitimacy and transformation vis-à-vis secular establishment, the AKP’s strong push for the European Union (EU) membership during its initial years epitomized this linkage. Within the country domestic political scene, economic situation, civil-military relations, public-private sector interactions and civil society have all been transformed. However, as AKP solidified its electoral base and grip in state institutions, the EU membership lost its original appeal. While not negating the structural limitations for a middle power country, this talk will discuss the role of domestic determinants of foreign policy, with a particular focus on the role of new elites, their cognitive map and changing ideational factors in foreign policy formulations.

 

Nilsu Gören, University of Maryland

“Extended Deterrence and Tactical Nuclear Weapons: The Turkish Case”

Turkey has not as yet been able to formulate an external security policy that reconciles its NATO membership and its regional engagement in the Middle East. Turkey’s security policies have responded to changing circumstances but it has not had the internal dialogue necessary to harmonize the operating principles associated with its traditional role in NATO with its current aspiration to have a defining role in its neighborhood. This presentation will analyze the Turkish position on the U.S. non-strategic nuclear weapons deployed on Turkish soil by addressing the following questions: Do these tactical nuclear weapons serve any Turkish security interest within the alliance? How do these weapons impact the regional dynamics and Turkey’s promotion of a WMD free zone in the Middle East? Would Turkey choose to pursue its own nuclear weapons, following the construction of its first nuclear power plants, if the United States dismantled its B-61 gravity nuclear bombs in Incirlik?

 

Ayhan Kaya, Bilgi University

“Desecularization of the State and Society in Turkey and Its Impact on Turkish Foreign Policy: Islamization and Ottomanization”

The AKP gained an absolute majority of parliamentary seats in the 2002, 2007, and 2011 general elections, as well as in the 2004, 2009 and 2014 local elections. It became the first party since 1987 to win the majority of seats in the Turkish parliament. Furthermore, it was only the third Islamist party ever to become a part of the government in modern Turkey since the coalition government established by Necmettin Erbakan’s National Salvation Party (Milli Selamet Partisi) in 1973 with the Republican Peoples’ Party (CHP), and then again Erbakan’s Welfare Party between 1995 and 1997 with the True Path Party (DYP). Following the devastating financial-economic crisis in 2001 when the coalition government (DSP, MHP and ANAP) was in power, the AKP leadership, especially Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, came accross a very fertile land for their landslide victory in 2002. Turned into a hero in the eyes of the conservative segments of the Turkish society in 1998 after he was imprisoned for four months because of a religiously loaded poem he had recited in Siirt, a southeastern province of Turkey, in 1997, Erdoğan had already attracted a great number of voters. One should also be reminded of the fact that subaltern, conservative and religious circles saw him as one of them, distanced from aristocracy, military, oppressive state, and the elitist Kemalist republicanism. This paper will discuss the ways in which the Turkish state has recently become desecularized under the AKP rule, and how the Islamization of the state and society impacted on the Turkish foreign policy making with a particular focus on cultural diplomacy performed by Yunus Emre Cultural Ceners.

 

Can Kasapoğlu, Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies

“The Syrian Civil War and Turkey’s Tough Choices: Ankara Facing the New Regional Security Environment”

Under the politico-military conditions emanating from the Syrian civil war, Turkey has been facing a tough security environment. Firstly, the intensifying sectarian context of the conflict has forced Ankara to adopt a Sunni-camp position, even unintentionally, at the outset of the civil war. Secondly, the complex politico-military landscape made it extremely hard to keep the strategic balance for the Turkish administration. Especially, running the peace process at home, which was planned to conclude the decades-long Kurdish problem through peaceful means, and managing the volatile situation in the Kurdish-populated areas of Syria comes into the picture as the main hardship. The underlying reason of Turkey’s “Kobane resistance” was mainly the security concerns stemming from the nightmares of a region-wide separatism trend under the upside-down Sykes – Picot status quo fears, which could eventually threaten the Turkish territorial unity. Besides, rise of the Islamic State threat has paved the ground for a new security challenge stressing the region including Turkey. In this respect, very recently, Ankara had to initiate a major “relocation operation” for its only territorial enclave, the historical Suleyman Shah Tomb, outside the republic’s borders. In tandem, the Syrian crisis caused a critical “militarization” of Turkey’s political stance and regional agenda. Since the beginning of the civil war, Ankara has been beefing up its military presence along the border areas. In addition, following the interception of a Turkish F-4 Phantom in 2012, the Turkish administration has shifted its rules of engagement towards Syria, which led retaliatory moves by Ankara that ended up with the downing of a Syrian Mi-17 helicopter and a Mig-23 aircraft. Moreover, the threat of chemical warhead-tipped ballistic missiles at the hands of the Baathist regime made Turkey to demand Patriot deployment from NATO. Finally, as the Syrian civil war turned to be a regional proxy war battleground, the Ottoman strategic legacy has bitterly reminded a Middle Eastern historical fact to the Turkish elite, namely, the Turkey – Iran strategic rivalry and power struggle.

Under these circumstances, how will Ankara protect its territorial integrity, and find a peaceful solution to the decades-long Kurdish problem? What will be the framework of Turkey’s solidarity with its allies in the struggle against the Islamic State threat? Above all, would / could the Turkish administration alter their foreign policy priority of toppling the Assad rule in Syria, and adopt a different approach?

 

Kemal Kirişçi, Brookings Institution

Syrian Refugees in Turkey: Why Were They Welcomed by the Turkish State?”

Within less than three decades Turkey received three mass influx of refugees: more than 300,000 Bulgarian Turks and Pomaks in 1989; almost half a million most Kurdish refugees from Iraq in 1991 and recently almost two million refugees from Syria. The latter influx together with a major increase in the number of individual asylum seekers puts Turkey among the top recipient of refugees in the world. What is more intriguing is that the Turkish government management of the Syrian influx is very different from the previous two. In the case of refugees from Bulgaria Turkey managed the crisis on its own and enabled the integration of the refugees into Turkish society even if many returned to Bulgaria once the communist regime there collapsed. The response to the second influx was dramatically different. The government tried to close its borders to prevent the refugees from seeking protection in Turkey and precipitated a major humanitarian crisis. The crisis was eventually resolved when with the U.S. support a “safe zone” in northern Iraq was created to ensure a precipitous repatriation of these refugees. In the case of these two influxes Turkey conspicuously refrained from using the term “refugee” preferring to refer to Bulgarian Turks as “co-ethnics (soydas)” and the Kurds, at the time the actual use of the word “Kurd” was problematic, as “guests”. In the case of the more recent influx Turkey after an initial but brief hesitation extended “temporary protection”, a status derived from international refugee law, to the victims and actually announced this policy in Geneva during an IOM meeting. Why? The presentation will offer an explanation based on three concept: the slow but effective “socialization”, mostly led by the UNHCR, of the Turkish state into the rules and practices of the international refugee regime; reform of Turkey’s asylum policies partly driven by the EU accession process and partly by domestic developments and finally a transformed politics of identity that, at least at the governmental level, created a more receptive climate to what were overwhelmingly Sunni refugees from Syria.

 

Kemal Sılay, Indiana University

“A Political and Military Predicament: The Escalating Danger of Islamism in Turkey and Discourses against Its NATO Membership”

In this presentation, Dr. Kemal Silay will focus on Turkey’s twisted relationship with NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or the North Atlantic Alliance) both as a military ally and as a political rival under the AKP regime. The Republic of Turkey joined NATO in 1952 after the twelve founding countries. A lot has changed in Turkey since then. Turkey is no longer a secular Republic which follows in the footsteps of its visionary founder Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. Its current foreign policy is based on Islamism and irrational neo-Ottoman dreams and illusions. AKP’s policies and operations are steering Turkey alarmingly and dangerously close to becoming a dictatorship. Its actions so far have proven that under the pretext of “democracy,” AKP seems determined to live up to the oft-repeated slogan of establishing a “New Turkey” by 2023, one that will essentially be an Islamist dictatorship, 100 years after the foundation of the secular Republic of Turkey. If this vision were to be realized, what would happen to Turkey’s NATO membership? Would the “New Turkey” itself (or whatever its official name would be then) leave the Alliance? Would the NATO restructure its rules to expel the “New Turkey”? And if either of these possibilities takes place, what would be the global military and political implications?

 

Ömer Taşpınar, Brookings Institution

“Turkey-EU Relations: Still Relevant?”

It has become a cliché to say that Turkey will never become a member of the European Union. With Europe unable to solve its economic and financial problems and Turkey moving increasingly away from Western standards of democracy, the conventional wisdom rings disturbingly true. Moreover, it is obvious that both the EU and Turkey have bigger priorities on their foreign policy agendas. Turkey is absorbed with the urgency of the Syrian war and the new Kurdish dimension of the conflict. For the EU, it is Ukraine and relations with Russia that are paramount. Under such circumstances, not much attention is being paid to Turkey-EU relations, and the issue appears increasingly irrelevant.

This is a sad state of affairs, because it is particularly in such difficult periods that both sides need each other the most. Turkish domestic politics has entered an era of unprecedented polarization. At a time when the rule of law, good governance, liberalism and democracy are in short supply at home, EU membership appears more and more attractive to an increasing number of Turks who used to feel optimistic about the future prospects for their country. According to a recent German Marshall Fund Transatlantic Trends survey, domestic support for EU membership has increased to 53 percent, up eight points from last year. This shows that EU membership is once again becoming a consensus issue in an otherwise polarized Turkish political context.
Given the populist tendencies of the AKP government, this is perhaps why the party, under the new leadership of Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu, is at least paying lip service to the goal of EU membership. Yet it is hard to avoid the impression that such pro-EU rhetoric coming from the AKP is nothing but a public diplomacy act in response to a Western media that is increasingly critical of worsening democratic standards and the Islamist trend in Turkish foreign policy. Turkey’s transatlantic partners are fully aware that under the AKP, Turkey is sliding back in terms of human rights, freedom of expression, independence of the judiciary, the fight against corruption and many other criteria of good governance. The European Commission (EC) Turkey 2014 Progress Report is a clear reminder of such dynamics. The report criticized Ankara on a number of points related to the independence of the judiciary and civil liberties and freedoms. Despite new blood in Brussels, the EU bureaucracy will face major structural challenges on the path to opening new chapters. In addition to old problems, such as negative European public opinion and reluctance in France and Germany, there are new problems on the Cyprus front.

Speaker Bios

Bilgin Ayata, Freie Universität Berlin

Dr. Bilgin Ayata joined the Center for Transnational Relations, Foreign and Security Policy in 2012, after holding a  postdoctoral fellowship at the KFG Transformative Power of Europe and at the Center for Area Studies at the FU Berlin. Bilgin Ayata’s research centers on transformation processes spurred by migration, conflict, social movements and memory politics. Her regional focus encompasses the Middle East and Europe, in particular Turkey and the Kurdish regions. For her Ph.D. she undertook a transnational analysis of forced migration of Kurds from Turkey with an innovative framework that linked the internal displacement of Kurds in Turkey with their external displacement to Europe as refugees. Conceptualising displacement as a form of statecraft, her dissertation identifies diasporas as political entrepreneurs who are able to challenge the politics of displacement with their transnational activism. She conducted fieldwork both in Turkey and among the Kurdish diaspora in Europe. In her postdoctoral research, Bilgin has focussed on Turkey’s transformation process and examined if and how EU reforms are negotiated at the normative level in domestic debates in Turkey on taboo issues such as the Armenian Genocide. Her most recent publication analyzes  changes in Turkish foreign policy in the wake of Arab revolutions. Bilgin’s theoretical and methodological interests derive from post-positivist approaches, critical theory and postcolonialism. She has received research grants and fellowships by the MacArthur Foundation, the German Academic Exchange Service, Friedrich-Ebert Stiftung, FU Berlin, Johns Hopkins University and York University. Her publications have appeared in academic journals in Europe, US and Turkey. At the Center for Transnational Relations, Foreign and Security Policy, Bilgin offers courses on migration, IR Theory, postcolonial IR and memory. In July 2014, she received the Lorbär Award for Excellence in Teaching.

 

Çiğdem Benam, Boston College

Dr. Çiğdem H. Benam holds a PhD in International Relations from the Middle East Technical University (METU), Turkey, and an MScEcon in Security Studies from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. She was a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University and study-fellow at the University of Oxford. She was awarded the British Council Chevening Scholarship of the UK government twice and was a participant of the US State Department International Visitors Leadership Program. She currently is a part-time faculty at Boston College as well as visiting researcher at Boston University, Institute for the Study of Muslim Societies and Civilizations. She specializes in International Relations and Comparative Politics, with expertise in modern Turkish politics and society, international relations theories, security studies, migration, political Islam, European Union, and Iranian politics.

 

Nilsu Gören, University of Maryland

Nilsu Gören is a Turkish Ph.D. candidate at University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy. Her dissertation focuses on Turkish security policymaking and cooperative security strategies to formulate a coherent Turkish nuclear posture between NATO membership and regional engagement on issues such as tactical nuclear weapons, air and missile defense, and the Iranian nuclear program. She previously conducted research at the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), Federation of American Scientists, and James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, and taught at Koc University, Istanbul. She holds a B.A. in Economics and an M.A. in Political Science from Sabanci University, Istanbul. Turkey.

 

Ayhan Kaya, Bilgi University

Dr. Ayhan Kaya is a Lecturer at the Department of International Relations, Istanbul Bilgi University; Director of the European Institute; specialised on European identities, Euro-Turks in Germany, France, Belgium and the Netherlands, Circassian diaspora in Turkey, and the construction and articulation of modern diasporic identities; received his PhD and MA degrees at the University of Warwick; his latest book is on the comparison of contemporary integration, citizenship and integration regimes of Germany, France, Belgium and the Netherlands (Islam, Migration and Integration: The Age of Securitization, London: Palgrave, 2009 April); his other recent books are as follows, Contemporary Migrations in Turkey: Integration or Return (Istanbul Bilgi University Press, in Turkish, co-written with others), Belgian-Turks, Brussels: King Baudouin Foundation, 2008, co-written with Ferhat Kentel), Euro-Turks: A Bridge or a Breach between Turkey and the EU (Brussels: CEPS Publications, 2005, co-written with Ferhat Kentel, Turkish version by Bilgi University); wrote another book titled Sicher in Kreuzberg: Constructing Diasporas, published in two languages, English (Bielefeld: Transkript verlag, 2001) and Turkish (Istanbul: Büke Yayınları, 2000); has various articles on Berlin-Turkish youth cultures, ethnic-based political participation strategies of German-Turks, Berlin-Alevis, historians’ debate in Germany, identity debates and Circassian diaspora in Turkey; translated Ethnic Groups and Boundaries by Fredrik Barth and Citizenship and Social Classes by T. H. Marshall and Tom Bottomore; co-edited a book Issues Without Borders: Migration, Citizenship, Human Rights, Global Justice, Gender and Security (Istanbul, Baglam Publishing House, in Turkish, 2003); co-edited another book titled Majority and Minority Politics in Turkey: Citizenship Debates on the way to the European Integration (Istanbul: TESEV, 2005); and his latest edited work (with Bahar Şahin) is Roots and Routes: Migratory Processes in Turkey (Kökler ve Yollar: Türkiye’de Göç Süreçleri) (Istanbul Bilgi University Press, 2007). Received Turkish Social Science Association Prize in 2003; received Turkish Sciences Academy (TÜBA-GEBİP) Prize in 2005; received 2005 Sedat Simavi Research Prize; and also received Euroactiv European Prize. He is recently engaged in two different FP7 projects called Modernities and Identities in Europe; and Pluralism and Tolerance in the EU.

 

Can Kasapoğlu, Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies

Dr. Can Kasapoğlu graduated from Ege University’s department of International Relations in 2006. He received his graduate degree from the Turkish Military Academy in 2008 through his MA thesis assessing Turkish irregular warfare activities in Cyprus before Turkey’s military intervention in 1974. Subsequently, he undertook doctorate studies at the Turkish War College where he gained his Ph.D. in late 2011 by successfully defending his doctoral thesis on “Conventional Forces in Low Intensity Conflicts: 1991 – 1999 Turkish Armed Forces Case”. Can Kasapoğlu is a member of the British think-tank Chatham House, and visited this institute for his doctoral literature review efforts. During his academic studies at the War College, he also served for Istanbul based think-tank, BUSAM at Bahcesehir University, as an analyst of political-military affairs concerning Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and Afghanistan – Pakistan (AfPak) strategic issues, and also conducted a field research in Syria in 2010. Following his doctoral studies, Dr. Kasapoğlu was invited by the Israeli realist school’s leading think-tank, The Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies, where he served as a post-doc fellow and published analyses on key regional issues including Turkish – Iranian strategic competition and the Syrian turmoil. As a result of his expertise on Turkish – Israeli affairs and familiarity with both sides’ strategic cultures, Dr. Kasapoğlu has published numerous articles for the reputable Israeli daily Jerusalem Post during the deterioration times between Turkey and Israel. Dr. Kasapoğlu specializes in strategic affairs in the MENA region, low intensity conflicts and hybrid warfare, defense issues; especially Israeli military thought and Iranian military modernization trends, and Turkish – Israeli relations.

 

Kemal Kirişçi, Brookings Institution

Dr. Kemal Kirişçi is the TÜSİAD senior fellow and director of the Center on the United States and Europe’s Turkey Project Brookings, with an expertise in Turkish foreign policy and migration studies. Before joining Brookings, Kirişçi was a professor of international relations and held the Jean Monnet chair in European integration in the department of political science and international relations at Boğaziçi University in Istanbul. His areas of research interest include EU-Turkish relations, U.S.-Turkish relations, Turkish foreign and trade policies, European integration, immigration issues, ethnic conflicts and refugee movements. Kemal Kirişçi is the author of several books on Turkey including Turkey and Its Neighbors: Foreign Relations in Transition (co-authored with R. Linden et al; Lynne Reinner, 2011), Land of Diverse Migrations: Challenges of Emigration and Immigration in Turkey (co-edited with A. İçduygu; Bilgi University Press, 2009), Turkish Immigrants in the European Union: Determinants of Immigration and Integration (co-edited book with R.Erzan; Routledge, 2007), Turkey In World Politics: An Emerging Multi-Regional Power (Co-edited with B. Rubin; Lynne Reinner, 2001) and The Kurdish Question and Turkey: An Example of a Trans-State Ethnic Conflict (co-authored with G. Winrow; Frank Cass, 1997). Kirişçi earned a Ph.D. in international relations from the City University, London; an M.A. in international relations from the University of Kent at Canterbury, England; and a B.A. in finance and management from Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. Kirişçi has also extensively published articles on Turkish foreign policy, EU-Turkish relations and immigration in academic journals and numerous op-eds on current affairs in Turkey since joining Brookings.

 

Kemal Sılay, Indiana University

Dr. Kemal Silay is Professor of Central Eurasian Studies, Ottoman and Modern Turkish Studies Chair Professor, Director of the Turkish Studies Program, and Director of the Turkish Flagship Center in the School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington. He is the author of numerous articles in Turkish and English on Turkish culture, literature, and politics. Among his books are Nedim and the Poetics of the Ottoman Court: Medieval Inheritance and the Need for Change (Indiana, 1994); An Anthology of Turkish Literature (Indiana, 1996); Ahmedi’s History of the Kings of the Ottoman Lineage and Their Holy Raids against the Infidels (Harvard, 2004), and an edited volume, The Turks and Islam: A Cultural and Political Journey from the God of Heaven to Allah (forthcoming). He is a scholar of international reputation and sought-after expert on many issues regarding Turkey, its language, literature, history, society, and politics. His numerous publications, cultural activities, and scholarly endeavors have sparked the field of Turkish Studies in the US and worldwide.

 

Ömer Taşpınar, Brookings Institution

Dr. Ömer Taşpınar is professor of National Security Strategy at the U.S. National War College and the director of the Turkey Project at the Brookings Institution. Taşpınar was previously an assistant professor in the European studies department of the Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), where he is still teaching as adjunct professor. He has held consulting positions at the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Human Rights in Washington, and at the strategic planning department of TOFAS-FIAT in Istanbul. The courses he has taught at the National War College and SAIS are: Islam and the west; non-military elements of statecraft; Turkey and its neighbors and the political economy of globalization. Taşpınar has a Ph.D. and M.A. in European studies and international economics from Johns Hopkins University (SAIS) and a B.A. in political science from the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. His research focuses on Turkey-EU and Turkish-American relations; European politics; transatlantic relations; Muslims in Europe; Islamic radicalism; human development in the Islamic world; and American foreign policy in the Middle East. Taşpınar is the author of two books: Political Islam and Kurdish Nationalism in Turkey (Routledge, 2005) and Fighting Radicalism with Human Development: Freedom, Education and Growth in the Islamic World (Brookings Press, 2006). Some of his recent publications include: “New Parameters in U.S.-German-Turkish Relations” (AICGS, February 2005); “The Anatomy of Anti-Americanism in Turkey” (Insight Turkey, July-August 2005); “Turkey’s European Quest” (Brookings Analysis Paper, September 2004); “Europe’s Muslim Street” (Foreign Policy, March-April 2003); “An Uneven Fit: The Turkish Model and the Arab World” (Brookings Analysis Paper, August 2003).

 

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FLAS Fellowships Summer 2016, Graduate Fellows
Lindsay Ozburn (Turkish) – EU Studies
Saniya Ghanoui (Swedish) – History
Marco Jaimes (Czech) – History

 

Summer 2016, Undergraduate Fellows
Liam Millett (Portuguese) – Geology
Safia Motan (Arabic) – Education


FLAS Fellowships AY 2015-2016, Graduate Fellows
Brennan, Bernard (Catalan) – Political Science
Duan, Mian (French) – EU Studies/MBA
Glock, Bethany (Polish) – EU Studies
Greppi, Teresa (Catalan) – Spanish & Portuguese
Henry, Lucas (Swedish) – Musicology
Margolis, Mitchell (Turkish) – Urban Planning
Myers, Barbara (Swedish) – EU Studies
Ozburn, Lindsay (Modern Greek) – EU Studies
Schwenk, Andrew (Italian) – EU Studies
Urberg, Michelle (Norwegian) – GSLIS
Wright, Peter (Turkish) – History

 

AY 2015-2016, Undergraduate Fellows
Deamont, Emme (Modern Greek) – Food Science & Human Nutrition
Fang, Ester (Arabic) – Political Science/History
Saadah, Bara (Arabic) – Engineering
Schmitt, Jordan (Modern Greek) – Actuarial Sciences


Summer 2015, Graduate Fellows
Myers, Paul (Swedish) – EPOL
Clasby, Caroline (Arabic) – EU Studies
Duan, Mian (French) – EU Studies/MBA
Ozburn, Linday (Modern Greek) – EU Studies
Marco Jaimes (Czech) – History

 

Summer 2015 Undergraduate Fellows
Colomb, Monet (Swedish) – Germanic Lang. & Lit.


Academic Year 2014-2015, Graduate Fellows
Bethany Glock (Polish) – EU Studies
Andrew Schwenk (Italian) – EU Studies
Elisa Facetti (Turkish) – French & Italian
Alexandra van Doren (Polish) – Comparative Literature
Barbara Myers (Swedish) – EU Studies
Marshall Janevicius (Arabic) – EU Studies
Lindsay Ozburn (Turkish) – EU Studies /GSLIS
Marco Jaimes (Czech) – History
Victoria Bauer (French) – EU Studies
David Sellinger (Swedish) – Germanic Languages and Literatures
Jacob Minniear (Turkish) – Curriculum & Instruction

 

Academic Year 2014-2015, Undergraduate Fellows
Ester Fang (Arabic) – Political Science
Clay Bahl (Arabic) – Global Studies
Safia Motan (Arabic) – Education
Renee Pond (Portuguese) – Molecular and Cellular Biology


Summer 2014, Graduate Fellows
Chelsay Endres (Turkish)-EU Studies
Caroline Clasby (Arabic)-EU Studies
Michelle Asbill (Bulgarian)-Social Work
Mian Duan (French)-EU Studies/MBA

Summer 2014, Undergraduate Fellows
Miranda Wickham (Turkish)-German/Political Science
Gloria Schmitz (Swedish)-Global Studies


Academic Year 2013-2014, Graduate Fellows
Michelle Asbill (Modern Greek)-EU Studies/MA
Brett Barkley (Turkish)-Urban and Regional Planning
Caroline Clasby (Arabic)-EU Studies
Lance Clemens (German)-EU Studies/MBA
Chelsay Endres (Turkish)-EU Studies
Zachary Grotovsky (Polish)-Germanic Languages and Literatures
Brent Rosenstein (French)-EU Studies
Matthew Spears  (Turkish)-Political Science
Caroline Wisler (Serbo-Croatian)-Landscape Architecture

 

Academic Year 2013-2014, Undergraduate Fellows
Hephestion Bolaris (Modern Greek)-Classics
Christian Garcia (Italian)-Political Science
Alexis Gonzalez (Polish)-Global Studies
Jennan Qato (Arabic)-Anthropology
Umara Yaqub (Arabic)-Global Studies


Summer 2013, Graduate Fellows
Levi Armlovich (Turkish)-EU Studies/Law
Michelle Asbill (Bulgarian)-EU Studies
Lance Clemens (German)-EU Studies/MBA
Jennifer Levy (Arabic)-Political Science
Paul Meyers (Swedish)-Education Policy Organization and Leadership
Brent Rosenstein (Arabic)-EU Studies

 

Summer 2013, Undergraduate Fellows
Jennan Qato (Arabic)-Anthropology
Miranda Wickham (Turkish)-German & Political Science


Academic Year 2012-2013, Graduate Fellows
Levi Armlovich (Turkish)-EU Studies/Law
Dinah Armstead (Arabic)-Ed. Pol. & Organizational Leadership
Michelle Asbill (Bulgarian)-EU Studies/Social Work
Natalie Cartwright (Turkish)-EU Studies
Lance Clemens (Bulgarian)-EU Studies/MBA
Allyce Husband (Italian)-EU Studies
Matthew Spears (Turkish)-Political Science
Sandra Spears (Turkish)-Social Work
Whitney Taylor (French)-EU Studies
Jerry Vassalla (Turkish)-EU Studies

 

Academic Year 2012-2013, Undergraduate Fellows
Christopher Baldwin (Portuguese)-Spanish, Italian and Portuguese
Joshua Erb (Arabic)-Global Studies
Lauren Fritzsche (Arabic)-Global Studies/Anthropology
Alexandra Gecas (Italian)-Global Studies Italian


 Summer 2012, Graduate Fellows
Dinah Armstead (Arabic)-Education Policy & Organizational Leadership
Natalie Cartwright (Turkish)-EU Studies
Lauren Hansen (Polish)-Germanic Languages and Literature
Rumyana Hristova (Bosnian)-GSLIS
Allyce Husband (French)-EU Studies
Neil Vander Most (Dutch)-Political Science

 

Summer 2012, Undergraduate Fellows
Mateusz Jasieniecki (Polish)-Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies
William Mahoney (Swedish)-Germanic Languages and Literature


Academic Year 2011-2012, Graduate Fellows
Erik Vickstrom (Swedish)-EU Studies
Alexandra Lively (Portuguese)-EU Studies
Katie O’Dowd (Portuguese)-EU Studies
Lauren Turk (French)-EU Studies
Devon Lechtenberg (Czech)-Geography
Allyce Husband (Italian)-EU Studies
Danail Koev (Serbo-Croatian)-Political Science
Rumyana Hristova (Serbo-Croatian)-GSLIS
Matthew Spears (Turkish)-Political Science
Sandra Spears (Turkish)-Social Work
Dinah Armstead (Arabic)-Education Policy and Organization Leadership

 

Academic Year 2011-2012, Undergraduate Fellows
Joshua Erb (Arabic)-LAS/ Global Stuides
Ranya Hasan (Arabic)-Psychology
Cristian Garcia (Italian)-General Studies


 

Summer 2011, Graduate Fellows
Alexandra Balas (Turkish)-Political Science
Christina Ceisel (Spanish)-Communications
Heba Elayan (Arabic)-Urban Plan
Lauren Hansen (Polish)-German
Amos Lieberman (Arabic)-Spa., Ital., Portug.
Michelle Salerno (Italian)-Theatre
Jerry Vassalla (Turkish)-European Union Studies

 

Summer 2011, Undergraduate Fellows
Jacqueline Schiffer (Italian)-Music


 

Academic Year 2010-2011, Graduate Fellows
Bergen Bassett (Swedish)-EU Studies
Alyssa Briggs (French)-Library Science
Adam Heinz (Portuguese)-EU Studies
Renee Holley (German)-Music
Mashael Majid (Arabic)-Urban Planning
Boris Pilev (Portuguese)-Labor and Employment
Michelle Salerno (Italian)-Music
Lauren Turk (French)-EU Studies
Jerry Vassalla (Turkish)-EU Studies
Daniel Weber (Polish)-Political Science

 

Academic Year 2010-2011, Undergraduate Fellows
Jessica Campion (Italian)-Media
Jennifer Levy (Arabic)-LAS
Jenna Tsarpalas (Greek)-Global Studies


 

Summer 2010, Graduate Fellows
Alyssa Briggs (French)-Library Science
Adam Heinz (Portuguese)-EU Studies
Renee Holley (German)-Music
Samantha Michalska (Polish)-Slavic Lit
Neil Vander Most (Dutch)-Political Science
Jerry Vassalla (Turkish)-EU Studies


 

Academic Year 2009-2010, Graduate Fellows
Tatiana Afanasyeva (Turkish)-Russian & East European Studies
Richelle Bernazzoli (Serbo-Croatian)-Geography
Alyssa Briggs (French)-Library Science
Zach Claybaugh (Serbo-Croatian)-Russian & East European Studies
Renee Gordon (German)-Music
James Keller (Serbo-Croatian)-Russian & East European Studies
Devon Lechtenberg (Polish)-Russian & East European Studies
Jason Wheeler (French)-Architecture


 

Summer 2009, Graduate Fellows
Elise Ahn (Turkish)-Educational Policy Studies
Richelle Bernazzoli (Serbo-Croatian)-Geography
Jennifer Bliss (German)-Comparative Literature
Steven Del Corso (Serbo-Croatian)-History
Renee Gordon (German)-Music
James Keller (Serbo-Croatian)-Russian & East European Studies
Neil Vander Most (Dutch)-Political Science


 

Academic Year 2008-2009, Graduate Fellows
Zachariah Claybaugh (Serbo-Croatian)-REEES
Steven Del Corso (Serbo-Croatian)-History
Katerhine Hamilton (French)-Political Science
Paul Hartley (Turkish)-Music
John Mann (Serbo-Croatian)-REEES
Gregory Polanksy (Czech)-History


 

Summer 2008, Graduate Fellows
Dinah Armstead (French)-Ed Policy Studies
Adam Chambers (Dutch)-German
John Mann (Serbo-Croatian)-REEES
Tracy Marvin (Catalan)-DEIL


 

Academic Year 2007-2008, Graduate Fellows
Karen Lichtman (German)-Linguistics
Tracy Marvin (Catalan)-DEIL
Gregory Polanksy (Czech)-History
Kevin Turley (Czech)-REEES


Summer 2007, Graduate Fellows
Elise Ahn (Turkish)-Ed Policy Studies
John Mann (Serbo-Croatian)-REEES
Amanda Sheffer (Swedish)-German
Mattias Stephan (Danish)-Comp. Lit.


Academic Year 2006-2007, Graduate Fellows
Jessica Kamm (German)-History
Jennifer Lundquist Serbo-Croatian)-History
Loren Puette (Polish)-REEES
Samantha Singer (German)-Urban Planning


 

Summer 2006, Graduate Fellows
Elise Ahn (Turkish)-Ed Policy Studies
Laura Engel (Spanish)-Ed Policy Studies
Loren Puette (Polish)-REEES
Amy Sayre-Roberts (Portuguese)-English


 

Academic Year 2005-2006, Graduate Fellows
Elise Ahn (Turkish)-Ed Policy Studies
Andrew Demshuk (Polish)-History
Laura Engel (Spanish)-Ed Policy Studies
Ted Gournelos (French)-Communications
Elizabeth Spreng (Czech)-Anthropology
James Wrzosek (German)-History


 

Summer 2005, Graduate Fellows
Andrew Asher (Polish)-Anthropology
Erma Hammons (German)-History
Jeffrey Love (Irish)-German
Christopher Stewart (Spanish)-French


 

Academic Year 2004-2005, Graduate Fellows
Andrew Asher (German)-Anthropology
Lori Czerwionka (Portuguese)-Linguistics
Erma Hammons (German)-History
Heather Lee (Portuguese)-Ed Policy Studies
April Lindsey (German)-History
Rachel Shulman (German)-History
James Wrzosek (German)-History


 

Summer 2004, Graduate Fellows
Amanda Eisemann (Dutch)-History
Ashley Filmer (Polish)-REEES
Tatiana Kuzmic (German)-Comp. Lit.
Rachel Shulman (German)-History


 

Academic Year 2003-2004, Graduate Fellows
Amanda Brian (German)-History
Susan Kelleher (Czech)-Art
Alexia Kruger (Swedish)-Music
Heather Lee (Portuguese)-Ed Policy Studies
William Morris (German)-History
Rachel Shulman (German)-History

Turkish Studies Symposium 2014

 

Eighth Annual Turkish Studies Symposium
After Gezi Park Protests Rethinking Turkish Politics and Political Culture

Symposium Poster

1

Monday, April 28, 2014
1:30 – 5:30 PM

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Illini Union, General Lounge (Room 210)
1401 W. Green St.
Urbana, IL 61801 (map)

Organized by:
European Union Center

Co-sponsored by:
Russian, East European and Eurasian Center (REEEC)
Center for Global Studies (CGS)
Center for South Asian & Middle Eastern Studies (CSAMES)
Department of Linguistics
Department of Political Science
School of Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics

EUC, REEEC, and CGS are National Resource Centers funded by the US Department of Education Title VI grant. EUC is also an European Union Center of Excellence funded by the European Union. CSAMES is funded in part by the Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program, International Studies Division of the U.S. Department of Education.

About the Symposium

2The Eighth Annual Turkish Studies Symposium (TSS) will explore the theme “After Gezi Park Protests — Rethinking Turkish Politics and Political Culture.” A small protest against the destruction of Gezi Park in downtown Istanbul in late May 2013 has triggered wide-ranging public demonstrations and an outpour of frustration with the authoritarian style of governance. This was arguably the largest wave of protests in Turkey’s history, which have brought together an unusual coalition, a diverse profile of demonstrators that would not have come together before: independents stood side-by-side with the nationalists, anticapitalist-Islamists, LGBT activists, soccer fans, Kurds, Alevis, and people from across the political spectrum. This most diverse, inclusive and democratic wave of protests that Turkey has ever seen turned into sites where the possibility of co-existence was proven as a viable model for Turkish society.

The mass protests and the unfolding events since May 2013, including the widespread corruption accusations leveled at the 11-year AKP government by followers of an Islamic movement, Gulen Hareketi, marked a turning point not only in Turkey’s domestic politics and political culture but also in its foreign policy. The domestic political stability as well as the AKP government’s hyperactive, assertive foreign policy began to crack and the image of Turkey in the international arena took a serious hit. More specifically, the protests and unfolding events have called into question the “Turkish model” —a template that “effectively integrates Islam, democracy and vibrant economics”, for the transitional regimes in the Middle East, on the one hand, and Turkey’s future with the European Union (EU), on the other.

The symposium will address key issues raised by the Gezi protests and the recent challenges faced by the AKP government: What are the new avenues opened up by this broad public mobilization and what is the direction of new social and political cultural developments in the aftermath of Gezi protests? How will these recent developments affect the local elections in March 2014? And, what does the future hold for Turkey’s role in its broader region in light of these milestone events? Some of the larger (domestic) issues we will address are the role of political Islam in Turkish democracy, changing contours of state-society relations, and new (non-traditional) actors of democratic participation. We will also situate the events within Turkey’s current regional context (tensions in the Middle East, specifically the Syrian crisis, and Turkey-EU relations). We will specifically explore the question of whether the recent events imply a rejection of Turkish foreign policy under AKP rule that is increasingly defined by detachment from the European agenda on the one hand, and neo-imperial aspirations in the former Ottoman space, on the other.

Schedule

1:15 pm

Coffee/tea and refreshments

1:30 pm

Welcome and Introductory Remarks

1:45 pm

Panel I

PANEL I – WHOSE TURKEY IS IT?
3New Actors of Democratic Participation and Activism and Re-Thinking the Role of Political Islam and State-Society Relations in Turkey

Panelists:
Fatma Müge Göçek
, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan
“Contested Spaces in Contemporary Turkey”

Avital Livny, Political Science, Stanford University
“The Gezi Generation? Political Attitudes and Behavior in Contemporary Turkey”

Sinan Ciddi, Executive Director, Institute of Turkish Studies; Visiting Assistant Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University
“Turkey’s Election Season: Emerging Patterns of Political Participation”

Moderator: Ercan Balcı, Linguistics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

3:30 pm

Break: Coffee/tea and refreshments

3:45 pm

Panel II

Panel II – WHITHER TURKEY’S SOFT POWER IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND REIGNITING EU-TURKEY RELATIONS?
4Rethinking Turkish Foreign Policy

Panelists:
Güneş Murat Tezcür, Political Science, Loyola University Chicago
Protesters as Democrats or Coup Plotters? Reflections on Turkish Foreign Policy in an Eria of Popular Uprisings”

Bill Park, Defense Studies, Kings College London
Turkey’s Multiple Kurdish Dilemmas – Syria, Iraq and at Home: Threats and Opportunities”

Moderator: Mahir Şaul, Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

4:45 pm – 5:15 pm

Q & A and Wrap-Up

Abstracts

Sinan Ciddi, “Redefining Political Opposition in Turkey: From Political Parties to the Gezi Protests
Fatma Müge Göçek, “Contested Spaces in Contemporary Turkey
Avital Livny, “The Gezi Generation? Political Attitutdes and Behavior in Contemporary Turkey
Bill Park, “Turkey’s Multiple Kurdish Dilemmas – Syria, Iraq and at Home; Threats and Opportunities
Güneş Murat Tezcür, “Protesters as Democrats or Coup Plotters? Reflections on Turkish Foreign Policy in an Era of Popular Uprisings

Sinan Ciddi, Institute of Turkish Studies; Visiting Assistant Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

“Redefining Political Opposition in Turkey: From Political Parties to the Gezi Protests”

Since Turkey held general elections in June 2011, heightened scholarly discussion has focused on the country’s evolving party system. During the last decade since the Justice and Development Party (Adalet ve Kalkınma Partisi-AKP) took over the reins of government, scholars have increasingly commented on two observable trends: a reduction in voter volatility and realignment of votes to the AKP. Three successive electoral victories for the AKP have ignited debates regarding the existence of a dominant party system. The AKP effectively remains electorally unchallenged and is comfortably situated as a single party government with virtually unimpeded legislative and executive capabilities. Why is this the case? Since its first national victory in 2002, the AKP’s large parliamentary majority has allowed the party to implement a wide array of programmatic priorities. The AKP’s parliamentary majority is reinforced by its equally impressive performance in local government elections.
In brief, since 2002 the AKP’s governing mandate has seldom been challenged by opposition political parties in parliament. Both the main opposition Republican People’s Party (Cumhuriyet Halk Partisi-CHP) and the Nationalist Action Party (Milliyetçi Hareket Partisi-MHP) lack the necessary parliamentary seats to block the passage of AKP legislative pursuits. Instead, predominant challenges to AKP rule have appeared in the form of extra-parliamentary and arguably undemocratic forces. The office of the President while occupied by Ahmet Necdet Sezer (2000-07), the Constitutional Court and the armed forces – to varying degrees and on different occasions – mounted individual challenges to undermine the government. President Sezer made history by vetoing more pieces of (AKP-passed) legislation than any of his predecessors. The country’s constitutional court mounted a nearly successful campaign the close down the AKP (2007), accusing it of being “a focus of anti-secular” activities. Finally, the armed forces, which for most of the multiparty era in Turkey (1946 onwards) considered itself as the ultimate guardian of the secular Kemalist state, issued a communiqué on April 27, 2007 highlighting their concerns regarding the government’s choice for president: Abdullah Gül.
In sum, the two main opposition parties are beleaguered by a significant problem: an entrenched inability to be perceived by electors as credible governing alternatives to the AKP. Although the CHP has held the title of “main” opposition party since 2002, its vote share is (presently) approximately half of the AKP’s. The MHP was not able to enter parliament in 2002 due to Turkey’s extraordinarily high 10 percent threshold, and its electoral performance since 2007 has been even less impressive than that of the CHP (See Table 1). Voters who do not identify with the AKP have for the last decade complained about the lack of a credible alternative to the government. The purpose of this article is an attempt to answer the question of why in a competitive parliamentary democracy has the AKP not faced credible political opposition? Why have neither the CHP nor the MHP been perceived as credible governing alternatives in the eyes of voters? In other words if organised political opposition remains weak, can one cite or find any form of democratic opposition which may present the AKP with an electoral challenge?

Fatma Müge Göçek, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan

“Contested Spaces in Contemporary Turkey”

This talk analyzes the theories on the use of social space within the context of the last decade in turkey when neoliberalism made significant strides into social life in general and everyday interactions in particular. after presenting a
brief history of the use of space in ottoman and republican history, it identifies the urban, secular, illegal and the environment
as the four spaces within which the negotiation appears most intense and conflictual.

Avital Livny, Political Science, Stanford University

“The Gezi Generation? Political Attitudes and Behavior in Contemporary Turkey”

Bill Park, Defense Studies, Kings College London

“Turkey’s Multiple Kurdish Dilemmas – Syria, Iraq and at Home; Threats and Opportunities”

With the emergence of the Kurdistan Regional Government of northern Iraq to quasi-statehood, the growing political and economic relationship between it and Turkey, the turmoil in Syria that has led to the establishment of self-governing Kurdish zones in the country, and Turkey’s continuing attempts to resolve its own Kurdish problem, Ankara is now grappling with a ‘Kurdish issue’ that is more transborder, complex, overlapping and interlinked than ever before. This address will trace the relationship between these various and fast-moving dimensions of Turkey’s Kurdish dilemmas, and speculate about the range of possible outcomes. It will also seek to locate Turkey’s Kurdish policies and problems within the context of wider regional and global dynamics, notably the ‘Arab Spring’; Turkey’s policies towards the wider Middle East region; and Turkey’s domestic politics.

Güneş Murat Tezcür, Political Science, Loyola University Chicago

“Protesters as Democrats or Coup Plotters? Reflections on Turkish Foreign Policy in an Era of Popular Uprisings”

As Turkish Prime Minister Erdoğan has consolidated his domestic power and achieved sustainable economic growth, activism in Turkish policy has been a defining element of his rule. Turkey, a regional power with global aspirations, has greatly involved in an increasingly polarized Middle East while its relations with the EU has stagnated. This presentation historicizes and contextualizes Turkish foreign policy and suggests how a realist approach continues to decisively inform its priorities and decisions.

Speaker Bios

Fatma Müge Göçek, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan

Fatma Müge Göçek is a Professor of Sociology and Women’s Studies. Her research focuses on the comparative analysis of history, politics and gender in the first and third worlds. She critically analyzes the impact of processes such as development, nationalism, religious movements and collective violence on minorities. Her published works includes East Encounters West: France and the Ottoman Empire in the 18th Century (Oxford University Press, 1987), Reconstructing Gender in the Middle East: Tradition, Identity, Power (Columbia University Press, 1994 co-edited with Shiva Balaghi), Rise of the Bourgeoisie, Demise of Empire: Ottoman Westernization and Social Change (Oxford University Press, 1996), Political Cartoons in the Middle East (Markus Wiener Publishers, 1998), Social Constructions of Nationalism in the Middle East (SUNY Press, 2002), The Transformation of Turkey: Redefining State and Society from the Ottoman Empire to the Modern Era (I.B. Tauris Publishers, 2011), and A Question of Genocide: Armenians and Turks at the End of the Ottoman Empire (Oxford University Press, 2011 co-edited with Ronald Grigor Suny and Norman Naimark).

Avital Livny, Political Science, Stanford University

Avital Livny is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. She also holds an M.Phil. in Modern Middle Eastern Studies from Oxford University. Her research interests generally fall under the heading of comparative politics and include: the politics of religion and ethnicity, particularly the micro-foundations of identity-based mobilization; electoral dynamics in developing democracies; and variations in interpersonal trust, across space and time. Her region of interest is the Muslim World, particularly the Muslim Middle East, and she has conducted extensive research in Turkey.

Sinan Ciddi, Executive Director, Institute of Turkish Studies: Visiting Assistant Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Sinan Ciddi is an expert on Turkish domestic politics and foreign policy. He obtained his Ph.D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London in 2007 in the field of Political Science. Ciddi continues to author scholarly articles, opinion pieces and book chapters on contemporary Turkish politics and foreign policy, as well as participate in media appearances (see http://turkishstudies.org/about/sinan_ciddi/index.shtml). In addition to his teaching and research responsibilities at Georgetown, Ciddi also serves as the Executive Director of the Institute of Turkish Studies.

Ciddi was born in Turkey and educated in the United Kingdom. He was previously an instructor at Sabanci University between 2004-2008 and completed his Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the same institution between 2007-2008. Distinct from his articles and opinion editorials, Ciddi’s book titled Kemalism in Turkish Politics: The Republican People’s Party: Secularism and Nationalism (Routledge, January 2009) focuses on the electoral weakness of the Republican People’s Party.

Between 2008-2011, he established the Turkish Studies program at the University of Florida’s Center for European Studies.

Güneş Murat Tezcür, Political Science, Loyola University Chicago

Gunes Murat Tezcur (Ph.D. University of Michigan-2005) is an Associate Professor at the Political Science Department of Loyola University Chicago. His research focuses on themes such as political violence, politics of Islam, judicial activism, and electoral politics. He is the author of Muslim Reformers in Iran and Turkey: The Paradox of Moderation. His current main research project examines the motivations of ordinary people who take extraordinary risks and join armed groups with a focus on the Kurdish insurgency. His research has been supported by major grants from the National Science Foundation, the United States Institute of Peace, and currently the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation. He teaches courses on the Middle East, political violence, democracy, globalization, and politics of energy.

Bill Park, Defense Studies, Kings College London

Bill Park is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Defence Studies, King’s College, London University. He is the author of journal articles, book chapters, and monographs on a range of Turkish foreign policy issues, including its EU accession prospects, Turkey and ESDP, the Cyprus problem, Turkey’s policies towards Northern Iraq, Turkey-US relations, the Fethullah Gulen movement, and the Ergenekon affair. Among his publications are ‘Turkey’s policy towards Northern Iraq: problems and prospects’, Adelphi Paper No. 374, published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies, and ‘Turkey-KRG relations after the US withdrawal from Iraq: putting the Kurds on the map’, published by the Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College, in March 2014 (available online). He is currently writing a book on Turkey’s Kurdish predicaments. His book, ‘Modern Turkey: People, State and Foreign Policy in a Globalized World’, was published by Routledge in 2011. He is a frequent visitor to Turkey, and has given papers on Turkish affairs at various academic and official workshops and conferences around the world, and has appeared as a Turkey expert on British, Turkish, US, Russian, French, Iranian, Iraqi and Australian TV and radio, has given written and oral testimony on Turkish issues to both UK Houses of Parliament, and is used as a consultant on Turkish issues by various UK government agencies. He serves as a trustee and council member for the British Institute at Ankara, was until recently an Advisor to the Dialogue Society in London, and is an editorial board member for the journal Mediterranean Politics.

Previous Years’ Symposiums

2013 | 2012

Turkish Studies Symposium 2016

10th Annual Turkish Studies Symposium
MIGRATION, DIVERSITY, AND IDENTITY IN TURKEY AND THE EU

TSS328 April 2016

1:00-3:45 pm

 

Illini Union
General Lounge (Room 210)
1401 W Green St, Urbana, IL 61801
(map to Illini Union)

 

Organized by:
European Union Center at the University of Illinois

 

Co-sponsored by:
European Institute, Istanbul Bilgi University; Jean Monnet Chair, Istanbul Kemerburgaz University; and the Center for Global Studies (CGS); the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center (REEEC);  the Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (CSAMES); and the Program in Arms Control & Domestic and International Security (ACDIS) at the University of Illinois

Istanbul-Bilgi-University-European-InstituteKemerburgaz-logoEUC, REEEC, and CGS are National Resource Centers funded by the US Department of Education Title VI grant. EUC is also a Jean Monnet Center of Excellence funded by the European Union. CSAMES is partially funded by the US Department of Education Title VIa grant. This symposium is supported by funding from the US Department of Education Title VI and VIa grants.

 

ABOUT THE SYMPOSIUM

eu-and-turkey-300x174Symposium poster is available here.


Turkey is a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural country, housing approximately 50 different Muslim and/or non-Muslim ethnic groups, some of which are Sunni Turks, Alevi Turks, Sunni Kurds, Alevi Kurds, Circassians, Lazis, Armenians, Georgians, Jews, Greeks, Arabs, Assyrians etc. This ethno-cultural and religious diversity has recently become even more visible together with the growing number of European citizens, transit migrants, and refugees originating from Syria, Irak, Pakistan, Afghanistan and sub-Saharan Africa.
Turkey was mainly a country of emigration until the late 1990s, and has turned into a country of immigration since then. Having an Ottoman imperial legacy, Turkey continues to draw migrants and refugees from different parts of the world. However, Turkey’s geographical reservation on the 1951 Geneva Convention on the Status of Refugees does not allow refugees entering Turkey from its eastern borders to apply for asylum. This is why the Syrian refugees, for instance, have no legal status in Turkey, and this is certainly a reason why their already difficult stay in Turkey is becoming even more difficult. Despite the fact that Turkey has adopted the Temporary Protection Law in 2014, it is far from meeting the needs of  refugees – officially called “guests” – in everyday life ranging from education for children to the provision of health services. The fact that Syrians are ethno-culturally (Kurds, Arabs, Tukrmens, Asyrians, Cricassians etc.) and religiously (Sunni Muslims, Alevi Muslims, Kaldani Christians, Ezidis) diverse is making things even more difficult for the state actors and civil society actors to deal with different aspects of the crisis.
This symposium will focus on the current debates in Turkey and the EU with regard to the refugee crisis, and the management of ethno-cultural and religious diversity in Turkey as well as the EU. Speakers will cover issues concerning the reconstruction of European identity revolving around the debates on the refugee crisis, Islamophobia, ISIS, the rise of Christian rhetoric in Eastern Europe, de-Europeanization, and Islamization of Turkey.

silueti3

SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

1:00-1:05pm — Welcoming Remarks

 

1:05-1:25pm — Ayhan Kaya, Istanbul Bilgi University
“Turkey as a Country of Immigration: Homogenization of the Nation”
1:25-1:45pm — Bianca Kaiser, Istanbul Kemerburgaz University
“Integration Challenges faced by EU Citizens in Turkey”
1:45-2:05pm — Canan Balkır, Visiting Scholar, EU Center, University of Illinois
“From Immigration to Innovation Networks”

 

10 min Q&A

 

2:15-2:30 Break (Coffee & Tea)

 

2:30 – 2:50pm — İlkay Südaş, İzmir Ege University
“Life-Style Migrants in Turkey”
2:50-3:10pm — Saime Özçürümez, Visiting Scholar, CMES, Harvard University/Bilkent University
“Managing Diversity in Turkey: State Actors and Civil Society Actors Engaged in Integration”
3:10-3:30pm — Ulaş Sunata, Bahçeşehir University
“Syrian Refugees in Turkey”

 

10 min Q&Asilueti3

ABSTRACTS (in order of presentation):

 

Ayhan Kaya, Istanbul Bilgi University
“Turkey as a Country of Immigration: Homogenization of the Nation”

 

Turkey is a multiethnic, multicultural and multidenominational country, home to approximately 50 different Muslim and/or non-Muslim ethnic groups, including Sunni Turks, Alevi Turks, Sunni Kurds, Alevi Kurds, Circassians, Lazis, Armenians, Georgians, Jews, Greeks, Arabs and Assyrians. However, despite the last decade of democratizing reforms, the Turkish state has not given full official recognition to the ethnically and culturally diverse nature of Turkish society since the republic‟s foundation in 1923. Turkey’s ethno-cultural and denominational heterogeneity results from diverse waves of migration that have swept across Anatolia throughout its history. The history of migration towards Anatolia is also the Islamisation of Anatolia with the exceptions of Jewish migration to the Ottoman Empire in the late 16th century and of the migration of EU citizens in the early 21st century. New migratory flows have again turned modern Turkey into a destination country for immigration. This paper discusses the immigration flows to Turkey throughout history as well as the challenges and opportunities they have so far presented. In doing so, the paper will argue that the boundaries of the Turkish nation were prescribed with an emphasis on the holy trinity of Turkish, Sunni and Muslim elements, and thus question the prevailing idea of nation in contemporary Turkey deconstructing the notions of “migrants”, “guests” and “foreigners” used in everyday language as well as in the official documents.

 

Bianca Kaiser, Istanbul Kemerburgaz University
“Integration Challenges faced by EU Citizens in Turkey”

 

This paper analyses the particularities and heterogeneity of the EU immigrant community in Turkey, with special reference to the German community as the largest group. It will be outlined in which way this community has perceived of, and been affected by, Turkey’s transition from a country of emigration to a country of immigration. The reform and transformation process will be placed into the the context of Turkey’s Europeanization process. In particular, the areas of labor mobility, residence, and citizenship will be analyzed. The year 2013 will be credited as a major milestone in the development of Turkey’s migration policies with the new Law on Foreigners and International Protection starting to pave the way for a more comprehensive and formalized integration policy.

 

Canan Balkır, Visiting Scholar, EU Center, University of Illinois
“From Immigration to Innovation Networks”

 

Innovation is a product of interaction between actors that have sufficiently different knowledge in order to make Schumpeterian new combinations.” (Boschma & Martin, 2010:142). It has been cited in many studies that migrants have the potential to provide different types of knowledge other than the provided knowledge by the native population, and hence are likely to contribute to innovation through their economic engagement in both the country of origin and the host country. The focus on entrepreneurship and innovation allows for a complete new perspective in immigration policies. Instead of focusing on cultural differences and integration problems that might go along migration, the win-win situations that can results from cultural diversity and international knowledge exchange can be highlighted. Although the European Commission considers entrepreneurship as the backbone of Europe’s economy and key to ensuring economic growth, job creation and innovation, migrant entrepreneurship and innovation rarely forms part of a bigger economic agenda. This is also the case for the Turks in Germany comprising the biggest immigrant group. Although the historical long-term Turkish-German relationships bear a large potential for the role of German- Turk entrepreneurs in innovation networks,  does this relationships between German and Turkish actors exist or rare? The issues that will be discussed are the results of a three-year project within the framework of intensive cooperation program between Germany and Turkey.

 

İlkay Südaş, İzmir Ege University
“Life-Style Migrants in Turkey”

 

Turkey hosts diverse migrant groups today and among them, European lifestyle migrants are one of the most striking groups settled especially in the coastal Turkey. During the last two decades, many international tourism towns along the Mediterranean and the Aegean coastal zone of Turkey have changed into new destinations for lifestyle migration particularly from United Kingdom, Germany, Scandinavian countries and the Netherlands. However, previous researches on lifestyle/retirement migration in the Europe mostly focused on countries such as Spain, Portugal France and Italy; this study examines the characteristics of lifestyle migrants and their motivations in case of Turkey. After outlining the geographical distribution of different EU nationals in Turkey based on the recent statistical data, main motivations, cultural impacts and perspectives of the migrants for the future course will be presented.

 

Saime Özçürümez, Visiting Scholar, CMES, Harvard University/Bilkent University
“Managing Diversity in Turkey: State Actors and Civil Society Actors Engaged in Integration”


Civil society engagement in integration of immigrants and refugees has become an indispensable part of governance of human mobility in all countries. The key question, however, remains how such engagement will take place. This study will seek answers to this question by examining the case of Turkey in the past decade and the role of civil society actors as part of the integration process. It reviews the legal, social and political context within which civil society engagement in integration takes place in Turkey. It does so by examining the grey literature and the activities of the CSOs  (for example, interest groups, communities, social partners, INGOs) in the field of integration since the mid-1990s. It focuses on two major dimensions of the role of civil society in the management of diversity: service delivery and participation in policy processes (from agenda setting to monitoring) on integration. The study concludes by a discussion on the challenges and opportunities of civil society involvement in policy processes in Turkey.

 

 

Ulaş Sunata, Bahçeşehir University
“Syrian Refugees in Turkey”

 

Conflict in Syria began five years ago and there is no clear end in sight. Since March 2011, 70% of Syria’s population has left their homes because of civil war. There were at least 6.6 million internally displaced people (IDPs) in Syria as of December 31, 2015. The number of Syrians seeking international protection continues to increase. Approximately 900 thousand (897,645) Syrians arrived in Europe and applied for asylum between April 2011 and December 2015. However, Europe’s numbers remain quite low compared to Syria’s neighbouring countries. According to UNHCR Data from February 2016, there are about 5 million (4,786,412) registered Syrian refugees in neighbouring countries (56,2% of them living in Turkey, 22,3% in Lebanon, 13,3% in Jordan, 5,1% in Iraq, 2,5% in Egypt, 0,6% in North Africa). The focus of this speech is to understand not only Turkey as the biggest pool of refugee-hosting in the last five years but also “becoming refugee” as Syrian in Turkey. We will try to read Turkey and the refugee not as the main actors of the current global crisis, but their positions “in-relation-to” this phenomenon. In particular, we will concentrate on two Syrian refugee’s migration experiences: travel between the land border of Syria and Turkey and the sea border between Turkey and Greece.

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SPEAKER BIOS (in order of presentation):

 

Ayhan Kaya, Istanbul Bilgi University
Professor of Politics and Jean Monnet Chair of European Politics of Interculturalism at the Department of International Relations, Istanbul Bilgi University; Director of the European Institute; member of the Science Academy, Turkey; worked and taught at the European University Viadrina as Aziz Nesin Chair in 2013; worked and taught at the Malmö University, Sweden as the Willy Brandt Chair in 2011; specialised on European identities, Euro-Turks in Germany, France, Belgium and the Netherlands, Circassian diaspora in Turkey, and the construction and articulation of modern transnational identities; received his PhD and MA degrees at the University of Warwick, England. Some of his books are Europeanization and Tolerance in Turkey (London: Palgrave, 2013); Islam, Migration and Integration: The Age of Securitization (London: Palgrave, 2009); Migrations to Turkey Since the 14t Century (Istanbul Bilgi University Press, 2015, co-edited with M. Erdoğan); Contemporary Migrations in Turkey: Integration or Return (Istanbul Bilgi University Press, in Turkish, co-written with others), Belgian-Turks, Brussels: King Baudouin Foundation, 2008, co-written with Ferhat Kentel), Euro-Turks: A Bridge or a Breach between Turkey and the EU (Brussels: CEPS Publications, 2005, co-written with Ferhat Kentel, Turkish version by Bilgi University); wrote another book titled Sicher in Kreuzberg: Constructing Diasporas, published in two languages, English (Bielefeld: Transkript verlag, 2001) and Turkish (Istanbul: Büke Yayınları, 2000); translated Ethnic Groups and Boundaries by Fredrik Barth and Citizenship and Social Classes by T. H. Marshall and Tom Bottomore; and he edited several book on migration, integration, citizenship, and diasporas. Kaya received Turkish Social Science Association Prize in 2003; Turkish Academy of Sciences (TÜBA-GEBİP) Prize in 2005; Sedat Simavi Research Prize in 2005; and also Euroactiv European Prize in 2008.

 

Bianca Kaiser, Istanbul Kemerburgaz University
Bianca Kaiser (BA/MA Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Germany; PhD Bosphorus University, Turkey) is the founding and acting Chair of the Department of International Relations at Istanbul Kemerburgaz University, Turkey, where she teaches as a full professor of International Relations. Since 2015, she holds the Jean Monnet Chair in Education in Diversity. Apart from several Jean Monnet teaching modules, she was also Jean Monnet Chair in European Political Integration at Istanbul Kültür University, 2005-2011. Her special research interests are migration to Turkey, the Europeanization of Turkey’s integration policy, Turkey-German relations, and intercultural dialogue. She has pioneered original field research on migration toTurkey from the EU, and has been involved in several related projects. In 2012-13 she was part of an OSCE-initiated research group evaluating the new Turkish Law on Foreigners and International Protection, and still acts as national co-coordinator of the related Brussels-based MIPEX project. Her publications include many book chapters and articles about German and other EU migrants in Turkey, Germany’s foreign policy, a monograph on Germany’s European policy, and a forthcoming edited e-book on the challenges of the European Union from an intercultural perspective.

 

Canan Balkır, Visiting Scholar, EU Center, University of Illinois
Canan Balkır is professor of economics, Jean Monnet Chair in European Economic Integration and has been the chair person of EU Studies Department and coordinator of Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence at Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey. She was a Fulbright scholar at North Carolina State University, and British Council scholar in UK; Research fellow at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, UK; honorary fellow at the University of Exeter, UK. In 2011, she received first prize from Turkish Academy of Sciences for her book on “International Economic Integration: Theory, Policy and Practice”. She has also worked as a senior consultant to the Minister for Economics between 1987-91,and has been consultant to private sector. She is currently working on a book project with Ghent University, titled ‘The EU’s Expanding Trade Policy: Challenges for the Customs Union with Turkey’. Her recent publications include the book on the “Europeanisation of Public Policy in Southern Europe- Comparative Political Economy from the 2000s to the Crisis (Ed.in coll.Bolukbasi,Ertugal), Routledge; book chapters on “A reality Check to Migrant Entrepreneurship: The Case of German-Turkish Entrepreneurs” (forthcoming in 2016); “Europeanization of Trade Policy: an Asymmetric Track”; “Different Trajectories yet the Same Substance: Croatia and Turkey” (in coll. Aknur); “Comparison of Residence, Social Security and Citizenship Strategies of Turkish Return Migrants and Dutch Retirement Migrants in Turkey (in coll. Böcker)”; “Guests and Hosts: European Retirees in Coastal Turkey (in coll..Sudaş); “Europeanisation and Dynamics of Continuity and Change: Domestic Political Economies in the ‘Southern Periphery’” (in coll.Bolukbasi, Ertugal)

 

İlkay Südaş, İzmir Ege University
İlkay Südaş (M.A.-Ege University; PhD-Ege University in Izmir, Turkey) is an assistant professor at the Department of Geography, Ege University in Izmir. His main research interests include international migration, specifically retirement migration, lifestyle migration and cultural geography. He participated in research projects focusing on the EU citizens migrating to the holiday destinations located on the Aegean and Mediterranean coast of Turkey, such as Alanya, Antalya, Marmaris, Kuşadası and Ayvalık. His research focuses on the regional differences of EU immigrants in different destinations of coastal Turkey, their migration motivations, expectations and needs. His publications deal with migration process of the EU immigrants in different spots of Turkey. He has articles published in Revue Européenne des Migrations Internationales (REMI), European Journal of Geography and Insight Turkey. Within the frame of the “rural lifestyle migration”, “spatial segregation” and “gated communities”, he is currently conducting a research project about a recent mobility trend of the urban elite, escaping from the metropolitan areas towards the periphery of cities in search of a higher life quality.

 

Saime Özçürümez, Visiting Scholar, CMES, Harvard University/Bilkent University
Saime Ozcurumez (Ph.D., McGill) is currently a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration at Bilkent University (on leave 2015-2016). She conducts research and publishes on migration policy and politics in the European Union, Turkey, and Canada, health and immigration, gender and immigration, irregular immigration, integration and citizenship, media representation of migrants, comparative politics of deliberative democracy, and Europeanization research agenda. She has articles published in International Migration, Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies, Turkish Studies, Comparative European Politics, Journal of Common Market Studies, Uluslararasi Iliskiler-International Relations, Women’s Studies International Forum and European Political Science. She is the co-editor of two books: Of States, Rights and Social Closure with Palgrave and Asylum, International Migration and Statelessness: Concepts, Theories and Politics (in Turkish, UNHCR publications). Her current research is on the resilience of health care systems in Turkey, Jordan, and Lebanon in response to mass influx of refugees from Syria.

 

Ulaş Sunata, Bahçeşehir University
Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology of the Bahçeşehir University (BAU); Director of the Center of Migration and Urban Studies (BAUMUS). She received her B.Sc. in Statistics and M.Sc. in Sociology from Middle East Technical University, Ankara. She was invited to be a visiting scholar in the Institute for Migration Research and Intercultural Studies (IMIS) in Germany for her work in migration studies and was awarded scholarships by DAAD and Hans-Böckler Foundation. Professor Sunata completed her Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Osnabrück and joined the BAU academic staff in 2010. Professor Sunata has published numerous works in the fields of migration, globalization, diaspora, urbanization and gender studies including two books while in Germany. Her research deals with contemporary diasporas of Turkey and focuses on the complex migratory relationship between Turkey and Germany. Her recent work includes an oral-history project on the Circassian diaspora in Turkey. Since 2013, she has expanded her research towards developing and conducting academic projects about Syrian refugees. Her research method combines theoretical policy analysis with large-scale corpora and data-driven methodologies. Professor Sunata established the Center of Migration and Urban Studies (BAUMUS) in order to empower interdisciplinary teamwork and foster collaborative projects.

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Special pre-symposium event:

Transatlantic Security Symposium:
“Crossing Boundaries: Security and Migration in Europe”

28 April 2016
9:30-11:30am

Illini Union
General Lounge (Room 210)
1401 W Green St, Urbana, IL 61801

Speakers:
Ayhan Kaya, Istanbul Bilgi University
“Securitization of Migration and Islamization of Radicalism in the EU”
Maxime Larivé, University of Illinois
“Unstable Peripheries: Security and Strategic Challenges for the European Union”
Konstantinos Kourtikakis, University of Illinois
“Security in the European Union Neighborhood: The Role of Non-Governmental Organization Networks”

 

Organized by the Program in Arms Control & Domestic and International Security (ACDIS) and co-sponsored by the European Union Center at the University of Illinois.

 

Transatlantic Security Symposium poster is available here.

 

Previous Years’ Symposiums

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012

Turkish Studies Symposium 2012

Sixth Annual Turkish Studies Symposium:
Turkish Transnational Television – Reshaping of Diaspora Identities in Europe and the Rise of a Regional Cultural Hegemon

Symposium Poster

Organized by:gumus

European Union Center

Co-sponsored by:
Russian, East European and Eurasian Center
Center for Global Studies
Center for South Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Funded in part by an Institute of Turkish Studies grant.

Symposium date and location:
April 27, 2012
2:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Music Room, Levis Faculty Center
919 West Illinois Street
Urbana, Illinois 61801

(map)

Contact:
For more information, please contact Sebnem Ozkan at asozkan@illinois.edu.

About the Symposium

EzelTeamIn a pronounced shift in foreign policy, Turkey now is playing a more independent, active and important role in the Middle East and displaying its reaction more prominently to a lack of European Union progress in offering Turkey full membership in the community. Politics and culture go hand in hand. The increasing influence Turkey is projecting through its foreign policy throughout the region has received significant attention in international media and academia. However, an equally important yet entirely new phenomenon—transnationalization of Turkish television—has not been fully addressed. More specifically, Turkish TV serials have emerged as significant instruments of foreign policy and cultural diplomacy. They also present a new way of creating connections to the Turkish diaspora in Europe and building a transnational Turkish public. These transformative developments warrant careful discussion.

Ezel (1)Across Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia, Turkish and Arabic speaking populations are tuning in to the numerous satellite channels that broadcast Turkish and Arabic-dubbed TV series and soap operas. This half-day symposium aims to understand the complex connections between media use, cultural belonging and worldviews. It will address the implications of the transnationalization of Turkish television for the immigrants’ experiences and identities in Europe as well as the increased popularity of Turkish TV series in regions from the Middle East to the Balkans to Central Asia.

Listen to the Mare Nostrum episode in which Sebnem Ozkan (EUC), Ercan Balci (Linguistics) and Mahir Saul (Anthropology) discuss the Turkish Studies Symposium, Turkish TV soap operas and pop culture from the region..

Schedule

2:00 PM

Welcoming remarks and introduction

2:15 PM

Panel I

OMAR AL-GHAZZI, University of Pennsylvania – Annenberg School for Communication
Title:
Neo-Ottaman Cool: The Rise of Turkey in Arab Media Space (based on an article with Marwan M. Kraidy)
Abstract: This paper explores the spectacular rise of Turkey in Arab media space as one of the most intriguing facets of Turkey’s rising role in global affairs, and one of the most important recent developments in transnational political communication in the Middle East. Based on an extensive textual analysis of the recent coverage of Turkey in a variety of pan-Arab and national daily newspapers and magazines, we identify and analyze different themes in Arab public discourse about Turkey’s rise as a regional great power. First we discuss a long Turkish-Arab history of mutual stereotyping in books, film and television. Second we explain the emergence of Turkey as a key geopolitical and diplomatic player in the Middle East, heavily covered in Arab media. Third, we analyze the recent pan-Arab popularity of Turkish television drama and cinema. Finally, we discuss the launch of TRT7-al-Turkiyya, a Turkish Arabic language satellite television channel based in Istanbul and Beirut, signaling the official entrance of Turkey into the global battle for Arab public opinion.In combination, this essay concludes, Turkey’s new Arab-friendly foreign policy pronouncements, the rise of its “soft power” through popular culture, and the establishment of a government-operated Arabic language satellite television channel, promote Turkey to Arabs as a soft sell and contribute decisively to the construction of what we call Neo-Ottoman Cool.Against the backdrop of Turkey imperial Ottoman history with the Arabs, the rise of Turkey in Arab media space compels a rethinking not only of media and geopolitics in the Middle East, but also of our understandings of the links between media, history and political identity.
muhtesemyuzyilNeo-Ottoman Cool, we argue, is grounded in a Turkish-inflected accessible modernity that is highly attractive to Arabs because it manages to combine a variety of hitherto separate and seemingly contradictory political, economic and socio-cultural elements in one seductive “package,” what one Arab columnist captured as “[A] European, Islamic, Secular, Capitalist Turkey.” The essay ends with a discussion of the challenges and opportunities that “soft power” affords Turkey in a changing world order.BEYAZIT AKMAN, Illinois State University – Department of English
Title: Self-Inflicted Orientalism in Turkish Historical Drama on TV and Cinema: The Voluntary Acceptation and Application of European Colonial Discourse in Contemporary Productions
Abstract: Despite the exciting rise of Turkish productions of historical drama, most of these productions voluntarily accept the European heritage of Orientalist depictions of the Ottomans, Turks, and Islam in general. The portrayal of the Turkish/Islamic races as barbaric, primitive and vulgar; of the Turkish man as lustful and ignorant, of the Turkish woman as exotic and lascivious; and of the Ottoman harem as a hotbed of immoral and bizarre sexual encounters has long been a trademark of European colonial powers such as the British and the French. This Other-demonizing discourse served for centuries as a way to morally justify the subjugation of Middle Eastern peoples by reinforcing the artificial binary between the “sophisticated and democratic West” and “the ignorant and despotic East.” In this presentation, Akman will demonstrate that contemporary productions such as the Magnificent Century [Muhtesem Yuzyil in Turkish] are based on these stereotypical clichés and can therefore be culturally and socially harmful on a global scale.Commentator: MAHIR SAUL, Anthropology, University of Illinois

3:30 PM

Coffee Break

3:45 PM

Panel II

MYRIA GEORGIOU, London School of Economics — Department of Media and Communications
Title: Watching soap opera in the diaspora: cultural proximity or critical proximity?
Abstract: This paper focuses on the consumption of soap operas among women in the European Arab diaspora. Focus groups with Arab diasporic audiences revealed the significant role that soap operas play in sustaining a gendered critical and reflexive proximity to the Arab world. As a genre, both in terms of production and of consumption, soap opera represents a rich and contradictory ideological and moral space within media culture. The paper pays particular attention to the consumption of Turkish soap operas on Arabic satellite television. The popularity of Turkish serials among women in the European Arab diaspora intensified the ideological tensions and gender trouble around the television set.
gumus2As will be argued, soap opera viewing provides female audiences in the diaspora with opportunities to reflect on their own gender identities asdistant from hegemonic discourses of gender in their region of origin but as proximate to a moral set of values they associate with this same region. This was especially, but not exclusively, the case with young women born in the diaspora.DIMA ISSA, University of Balamand, Lebonon – Department of Mass Communication
Title: Situating the imagination – Turkish soap operas and the lives of women in Peoria, Illinois and Doha, Qatar
Abstract: Since 2008, Turkish soap operas have infiltrated television sets and computer screens across the globe, captivating Arab-speaking audiences with their scenic landscapes, attractive casts in devoted romances, and tight-knit family units. They have also catalysed a steady influx of tourists into Turkey and have ruffled the robes of religious clerics in the Middle East. Amidst the backdrop of a globalised and migrating world, and through an ethnic and social mix of women in Peoria and Qatar sharing an interest in the shows, the objective of this study was to discover what roles the Turkish soap operas played in their lives. Through the methods of one-on-one interviewing and focus groups, data was gathered and then analysed thematically, by drawing on Appadurai’s concept of ‘imagination’ and Ang’s definition of ‘subject positions’. Both theories were fused with Athique’s culturally motivated ‘situated imagination,’ which subjugates the imagination to diverse strata of personal identity, indicating a link between women’s backgrounds and their use of imagination to counter a sense of loss. This paper proposes that through their ‘situated imagination’ women in Peoria and Qatar are able to fulfil needs created by globalisation that affect their social, political and cultural identity, and thus look toward the Turkish soap operas to position themselves in all three areas.Commentator: ERCAN BALCI, Linguistics, University of Illinois

5:00 PM

Reception

Levis Faculty Center, Second Floor

Videos

Self-Inflicted Orientalism in Turkish Historical Drama on TV and Cinema: The Voluntary Acceptation and Application of European Colonial Discourse in Contemporary Productions

Watching soap opera in the diaspora: cultural proximity or critical proximity? Watching Soap Opera in the Diaspora: Cultural Proximity or Critical Proximity?

Situating the Imagination: Turkish Soap Operas and the Lives of Women in Peoria, Illinois and Doha, Qatar

Speaker Bios

Beyazit Akman has received his Ph.D. in English literature and culture at Illinois State University. He did his M.A. as a Fulbright Scholar from Turkey. In his doctorate scholarship he has focused on (mis)representations of Islam in the Western discourse from late Renaissance to the post-9/11 era. His publications include “Travel Knowledge and Orientalism,” “Shakespeare and the Turk,” “Defoe’s Turkish Spy,” and “Orientalism on Cigarette Packs” in peer-reviewed journals, and more than fifty book reviews and opinion columns in Turkish national dailies. He presented papers and organized panels at more than a dozen national and international conferences, including MLA, M/MLA and the ASECS. His 700-page historical novel, The Conquest (in Turkish) about Christian-Muslim relations during the Ottoman Empire has become a national bestseller, selling about 50 thousand copies and is being translated into other languages including English, Arabic, Greek, Croatian, Bulgarian, and Serbian. He turned down the offer from a 75-million-dollar production that would buy the movie/TV rights of his novel since he was not able to guarantee controlling the adaptation and scriptwriting process. He was invited as a speaker to international book fairs in Frankfurt and Istanbul. Most recently, he was awarded the prestigious Smithsonian Baird Society Fellowship in Washington, D.C. and he studied archival materials on the representation of the Ottomans and Islam in the Western discourse. At ISU, he designed and taught courses on British Literature and Islam, Orientalism, and Post-9/11 fiction. His dissertation “British Literature and the Turk Before 1800: Representations of the Ottomans and Islam from Late Renaissance to the Post-9/11 Era” challenges the binaries of representation of the Turkish identity as it was constructed and transformed through the ages and genres. He is currently working on Global Literatures and Islam, a collection of articles, forthcoming in late 2012 and on his second historical novel on the Ottoman Empire, due this year.

Omar Al-Ghazzi is a PhD candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on the ways collective memory and popular imaginations of history, as presented and contested in popular culture and journalism, shape constructions of Arab political identities. A former Fulbright fellow, he has completed a Master’s degree in International Relations at the American University in Washington DC and a Bachelor’s degree in Communication Arts at the Lebanese American University in Beirut, Lebanon. Omar comes from a journalism and media analysis professional background and has previously worked for the BBC and Al-Hayat Arabic daily.

Myria Georgiou teaches at the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics. Dr Georgiou’s research focuses on the ways media shape discourses of identity and citizenship within transnational and urban contexts. Her book Diaspora, Identity and the Media (2006, Hampton Press) was an ethnographic exploration of the relationship between media consumption and identity in London and New York. She has recently completed research within the EU-funded project Media & Citizenship in three European capital cities – London, Madrid and Nicosia. The project examined the role of satellite television in Arabic audiences’ sense of belonging. Her next book Media and the City is currently in preparation (forthcoming, Polity Press).

Dima Issa is a lecturer of Mass Communication at the University of Balamand in Lebanon. She graduated from the Lebanese American University with a BA in Communication Arts, emphasising in Journalism and Theatre. Today, she has an MSc from the London School of Economics in Global Media and Communications and an MA from the University of Southern California in Global Communications. Her research at both institutions focused on the roles of media in the construction of identity within transnational audiences. Dima’s professional experience includes working for the Doha Asian Games 2006, as the Head of Publications and Website. In addition she worked as a Television Anchorwoman in Qatar for over five years and took on various projects in the capacity of a consultant. She has lived in Qatar, Canada, London, Los Angeles and Lebanon.

Turkish Studies Symposium 2013

Seventh Annual Turkish Studies Symposium:
Ethnographies of Istanbul

Symposium Poster

istanbul-1Friday, April 5, 2013
9:30 am – 5:00 pm

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Levis Faculty Center (Reading Room, 1st floor)
919 W Illinois St.
Urbana, IL 61801 (map)

Organized by:
European Union Center

Co-sponsored by:
Russian, East European and Eurasian Center (REEEC)
Center for Global Studies (CGS)
Department of Anthropology
Department of Urban and Regional Planning
Center for South Asian & Middle Eastern Studies (CSAMES)

EUC, REEEC, and CGS are National Resource Centers funded by the US Department of Education Title VI grant. EUC is also an European Union Center of Excellence funded by the European Union. CSAMES is funded in part by the Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program, International Studies Division of the U.S. Department of Education.

Special pre-symposium event:

Film screening: Ekumenopolis: City without limits (a documentary film about Istanbul)

Introduced by and followed by Q&A Session
with Deniz Ay, PhD Student in Urban and Regional Planning

Thursday, April 4, 2013
Time: 6 PM

223 Gregory Hall
810 South Wright Street
Urbana, IL 61801 (map)

Film website
Watch trailer

Film screening is co-sponsored by the University of Illinois Turkish Studies and
Department of Linguistics Language Program Film Series
(Less Commonly Taught Languages – LCTL – Movie Night)

About the Symposium

istanbul_2Global cities exert as much attraction on the inquiring minds of scholars as on casual travelers, and cities that lie outside the older hubs of domination of Europe and the U.S. do even more so, not chiefly because they add the lure of the exotic, but also because they arouse curiosity on where our world may be heading. Centers of art, business, entertainment, politics, and agents of synthesis and change across sub-regions, they serve now as causes and beacons of major social and demographic shifts. Their chaotic energies can and have been scrutinized for insights into the vacillations and reorientations of our day or the likely shape of things to come.

Istanbul has been one of the cities contending for the title of global city since the 1990s. Its ascent predated and anticipated the growing visibility of the nation state, which it serves with increasing frequency as unofficial symbol, but it also gains visibility and influence from the sharper political definition of Turkey at the crossroads of the Middle East, Africa, and Eastern Europe. The city sprawls over the meandering shores and low hills surrounding the two sides of an inner sea that antiquity took to be the geographic divide between Europe and Asia, its financial and multiplying housing high-rise complexes standing at a respectful distance from the historic peninsula at the southeast corner of its European part that houses the heritage of its Ottoman and Byzantine pasts.

This symposium will explore the theme “Ethnographies of Istanbul.” It aims to explore a number of contemporary issues brought together in the hyper-urban space of Istanbul from multiple disciplinary perspectives, opening up a possible ending meditation on the degree of historical contingency or determination in their coincidence for further dialogue with comparable work done in other world areas. The three panels will be anchored around a set of themes that together provide a framework for such reflection:

  • The Allure of the Crossroads City: Cosmopolitan culture, immigration flows into/out of Istanbul, and the growth of international tourism
  • Challenges of Urban Redevelopment: Property Rights, Population Growth and Public Spaces:
  • Iconography and Islamic Fashion in Istanbul: The ‘art scene’ as cultural-business scene and Islamic fashion

Schedule

9:30 am

Coffee

9:45 am

Welcome and Introductory Remarks
Bryan Endres, Director, European Union Center; Associate Professor of Agricultural Law, University of Illinois
Mahir Şaul, Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Panel I

1-halic gunbatimi_1PANEL I – THE ALLURE OF THE CROSS-ROADS CITY:

Cosmopolitan culture, immigration flows into/out of Istanbul, and the growth of international tourism

Panelists:
Derya Özkan, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
Institute of European Ethnology
“Gecekondu Chic in Cool İstanbul: A new enclosure of the urban cultural commons?

Amy Mills, Geography, University of South Carolina
“Cosmopolitanism, Urban Friction, and İstanbul as an Actant City”

Mahir Şaul, Anthropology, University of Illinois
“An Immigrant Geography of Istanbul”

Moderator: Stafanos Katsikas, Modern Greek Studies, University of Illinois

12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Lunch (for presenters and invited guests)

2:00 pm – 3:15 pm

Panel II

Panel II – CHALLENGES OF URBAN REDEVELOPMENT:
Property rights, population growth and public spaces

2-skyline maslak_2Panelists:
Tolga İslam, Urban Planning, Yıldız Technical University, İstanbul
“The Evolution of Gentrification in İstanbul”

Asu Aksoy, Cultural Management/Communications, Bilgi University, İstanbul
“Improvised City: Adil Kebap Dürüm [short documentary screening with introduction/discussion by project collaborator Asu Aksoy; project by Asu Aksoy, Kevin Robins, Kaan Çuhacı]”

Moderator: Ercan Balcı, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

3:15 pm – 3:30 pm

Break
 

3:30 pm – 4:45 pm

 

3- cami gokdelenler_3Panel III – ICONOGRAPHY & ISLAMIC FASHION IN ISTANBUL:
The ‘art scene’ as cultural-business scene and Islamic fashion

Panelists:
Asu Aksoy, Cultural Management/Communications, Bilgi University, İstanbul
“Global City Looking for an Identity: Reshaping and Reimagining of Istanbul”

Anna Secor, Geography, University of Kentucky
“The veil, desire, and the gaze: turning the inside out (by Anna Secor and Banu Gokariksel)”

Moderator: Valerie Hoffman, Department of Religion; Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

4:45 pm – 5:00 pm

Wrap-up and Q&A

Abstracts

Derya Özkan, “Gecekondu Chic in Cool Istanbul: A new enclosure of the urban cultural commons?”
Amy Mills, “Cosmopolitanism, Urban Friction, and Istanbul as an Actant City”
Mahir Şaul, “An Immigrant Geography of Istanbul”
Tolga İslam, “The Evolution of Gentrification in İstanbul”
Asu Aksoy, “Improvised City: Adil Kebap Dürüm”
Asu Aksoy, “Global City Looking for an Identity: Reshaping and Reimagining of Istanbul”
Anna Secor, “The veil, desire, and the gaze: turning the inside out (by Anna Secor and Banu Gokariksel)”

Derya Özkan, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich Institute of European Ethnology

“Gecekondu Chic in Cool Istanbul: A new enclosure of the urban cultural commons?”

My paper discusses the changing imaginations of the gecekondu in Istanbul by focusing on the changing relationships between urban culture and cultural capital from the 1970s to today. One major aspect of this change is a shift from an understanding of the gecekondu as a negative signifier of “crude urbanization” (considered from a developmentalist point of view as typical of third world cities) to a reconsideration, affirmation and then celebration of the “crude” characteristics of urban culture as exciting and potentially positive features of a creative, cosmopolitan, “cool” city (seen from the perspective of neoliberal globalism). A fascination with the informal aspects of the gecekondu in particular and urban informality in general is increasingly replacing the earlier denunciation of urban irregularities and disorderlinesses. This is not only apparent in Istanbul but also cuts across urban cultural processes at a global scale. My examples come from several domains of urban cultural production, namely, practices of contemporary art and design, urbanism, tourism and the museum. In this paper I analyze a fashion collection titled Dolmuş and discuss how the urban social and cultural history of the gecekondu and the working class cultures of the 1970s in Istanbul are reappropriated and an aspect of local urban culture is turned into cultural (and eventually economical) capital by a fashion designer. To what extent do these practices function as a normalization of the urban social history of the gecekondu in Istanbul? In what ways can we consider these emerging practices of affirming the gecekondu as an enclosure of the urban cultural commons?

Amy Mills, Geography, University of South Carolina

“Cosmopolitanism, Urban Friction, and Istanbul as an Actant City”

This paper brings a materialist and sensorial urban perspective to studies of cosmopolitanism and national identity in Istanbul. Urban encounters condition local imaginations of what it means to be urban, and to be a Turk. Urban life involves reverberating interactions among things, people, and ideas that link urban situations to national and geopolitical processes. Inspired by Anna Tsing, I examine the “friction” of the city, the “grip of worldly encounter” that produces unpredictable and shifting connections with others. Urban encounters, connections, and interactions are interpreted by Istanbulites with images of a European modernity and words like ‘cosmopolitan’ (kozmopolit) and ‘civilized’ (medeniyet). These images and words, in turn, reproduce a particular understanding of an Istanbulite urbanism. Oral histories and satirical representations of urban encounters also employ nationalist discourses in an effort locate Turkish identity in Istanbul, and Turkey’s identity as European. I examine Istanbul as a material site of encounter that generates processes that reverberate beyond the city itself. This paper is based on two bodies of research: my previous ethnographic project on the formerly multiethnic neighborhood of Kuzguncuk, Istanbul; and my current research on representations of the city in Republican-era satirical journals. More than the theater for social interaction, the complex material and social elements of the city make it a generative space, an actant element in the processes of imagining and debating with whom, and where the nation’s future lies. This approach has interesting implications, for it demands that we consider processes such as rural-urban migration and the processes of urban renewal, urban development, or urban dislocation as having a bearing on geographic imaginations of Turkish national and geopolitical processes.

Mahir Şaul, Anthropology, University of Illinois

“An Immigrant Geography of Istanbul”

Migrants may typically occupy spaces abandoned by locals, but the volatility of emergent ethnic enclaves and the restlessness of socio-spatial transformation in Istanbul calls for commentary. In less than two decades sub-Saharan immigration has already gone through an eventful history of movement through the urban landscape. Theses based on fieldwork conducted ten years ago read as descriptions of a bygone era. The driving force of African neighborhoods in Istanbul is unregulated migration flow and the economic dynamism of the migrants, but state and now municipality set the parameters of urban morphology. National policy determined the fate of the earlier communities whose expulsion opened up inner city space for the new migrants; in the past benign neglect and electoral politics facilitated title transfer and de facto occupation, as it also allowed rural migrants occupy peripheral public domains for shantytown development. But the international migrants of our day come to a new climate. Not only the bustle of financial and export sectors, but unwritten rules of law and order set the boundaries of housing for the aliens. As rent-seeking replaces political patronage immigrant housing evolves around the contours of private and public gentrification projects under the logic of the market. The presentation provides an overview of the successive and diverse sub-Saharan neighborhood making efforts in Istanbul with questions on their stability in the near future.

Tolga İslam, Urban Planning, Yıldız Teknik University, İstanbul

“The Evolution of Gentrification in İstanbul”

It has been more than three decades since the first signs of gentrification are seen in Istanbul. In thirty years, the meaning and scope of the process has changed dramatically. This presentation describes the evolution of gentrification in Istanbul by examining the process in three consecutive eras with different dynamics: pre-2000s, early 2000s and post 2005, and highlights the discerning characteristics of each era.
The presentation gives a special focus on the post 2005 era of state-led gentrification under the guise of regeneration projects and tries to depict the dynamics of this new gentrification wave and address the similarities between and differences from cases taking place in the “global north”, as well as discussing its current and possible impacts on the local residents and the city as a whole.

Asu Aksoy, Department of Cultural Management, Department of Communications; Director, Cultural Policy and Management Research Center, Bilgi University, Istanbul

“Improvised City: Adil Kebap Dürüm”

The reflections in this paper start from the once-upon-a-time existence of Adil Kebap Dürüm, a small informal kebap business run from a roadside wooden shack in the gecekondu (slum) district of Paşa Mahallesi in Istanbul. The shack was built by Adil Tekirdağ, a one-time migrant from Urfa in the southeast of Turkey. Adil is a carpenter and gecekondu builder, and a talented musician playing saz and singing for many years in the clubs and bars of Beyoğlu in Istanbul. For Adil, the shack was for some considerable time his “bread basket”. But in recent years, Istanbul has been in a process of dramatic urban transformation. Those gecekondu areas within the central districts of the city have become development zones for real estate companies and investors. As a result the gecekondu land parcels began to be replaced by rising apartment blocks. Adil, alongside with the owners of the parcels in his neighbourhood, was compelled to (or wanted to profit from) the growing interest of real estate developers and decided to replace his old gecekondu house with an apartment. With the building of the apartment the kebap shack was dismantled as well. With this transformation, what has been termed the informal urbanization period, is coming to an end. As the informal city structures are razed to the ground in a manner that denies them any social or architectural or other significance, their place in the collective memory of the city is also being totally driven to extinction.

Our intention in this paper is to explore new ways and new modalities of addressing the significance of this fast dissapearing (and extinguished) gecekondu culture for Istanbul’s self-understanding – ways that aspire to transcend the prevailing condition of blame and effective closure on the issue of informal urbanization. The predominant discourse treats informal urbanization at best as a transitory phase towards modernization, undermining the creative labour of the self-made city. Seen by many as a block to modernization, to planning efforts and to city’s attractiveness in the global age, informal urbanization is counterposed to modernity. With the uptake of the neoliberal policies, the path towards global isation is seen to reside in the superimposition of urban renewal projects that claim to root out any remnants of pre-modern relations and reinstall modernity. What we shall be questioning is first, whether it is correct to characterise informal urbanisation as lacking in modernity, and second, analyse the kind of modernity that is been envisaged by the neoliberal urban renewal logic and then to see if this is the kind of modernity that we would like to inhabit.

“Global City Looking for an Identity: Reshaping and Reimagining of Istanbul”

Istanbul is at the heart of Turkey’s cultural and artistic production. The majority of cultural and creative industry companies and art institutions are based in Istanbul and with its centuries old urban history, it is one of the richest heritage sites in the country. Istanbul is therefore key to understand the politics of culture in the country. In this talk I shall be first, looking at the major cultural institutions and analyse what their cultural programming consists of, where they are situated in the city and how they constitute their audience. We shall see that there has emerged paralel cultural universes, one concentrating in the centre of the city, in the historic Pera district (the non-Muslim neighbourhood of the Ottoman period) and offering a diet of contemporary art to an international audience of highly sophisticated art circles and global cultural tourists; and the other, in the ‘peripheries’, that is to say, districts of İstanbul’s now fifteen million large metropolis, shaped by the municipal cultural centres offering socio-cultural programming that is being very much shaped by the present government of the AK Party’s politics of improvement of cultural services in the peripheries. The second issue to examine is the more general discursive climate that these cultural institutions find themselves in. We find that the ‘global city’ discourse has become central in AKP’s vision of Istanbul in the new millenium. Istanbul figures as the financial capital of the nation and of the region at large, a metroregion of increasing population composed of multiple centres reigning over a huge territory around the Marmara Sea, a global hub of communications, transportation and logistics, a major tourism destination competing with Paris and London and a global centre for congress business, fashion and cinema industry. This vision translates to museumifation of heritage sites, gentrification and cleaning up of historic inner-city areas, total transformation of certain central districts for recreation and global tourism and, of course, to massive new infrastructural projects such as new airports, city districts, bridges, and so forth. Istanbul in its entirety is being reshaped in the image of a global city of hyper mobility of capital and consumers. In this recounting of the making of the global city image, there is one aspect which needs closer scrutiny. In the third part of my talk, I shall concentrate on this aspect, that is to say, on the theme of ‘the reconquest of the city’. I shall clarify this by focusing on the recent plan to transform Taksim Square at the symbolic heart of the city’s republican history of modernization and secularization. As Taksim Square is being targeted to be re-ordered as a pedestrian zone flanked by a massive structure of the reconstructed Ottoman military barracks (the Topçu Kışlası) as a shopping mall and an entertainment area, this constitutes not just another step in making Istanbul closer to the desired global city image. It is, I shall argue, a significant move by the government to shape and re-balance the cultural and artistic identity that is now concentrated in the centre. The ‘open space’ idea of the Taksim Gezi Parkı – the public park in Taksim –will now be re-fashioned as a functionally defined space of shopping with its architecture that harks back to an imagined Otttoman past. The contemporary art scene concentrated in this area will be facing new competition from a recreation (an ice rink) and perhaps more significantly a new symbolic language of neo-Ottomanism. What will Taksim square say of Istanbul with this new image?

Anna Secor, Geography, University of Kentucky

“The veil, desire, and the gaze: turning the inside out (by Anna Secor and Banu Gokariksel)”

If clothes are the image of the self, then what kind of self is mapped upon the veiled surface? Veiling has inspired much political, social, and psychoanalytic critique, but the perspectives of women who veil are rarely the impetus for these theories. Our work is based on focus groups and interviews with over 80 veiled (tesettürlü) women in Istanbul and Konya. In the context of the rise of fashionable veiling in Turkey, we argue that veiling is not simply about blocking the gaze but instead about mobilizing a particular visual regime, one that enacts its own aesthetics and ethics. Veiled women are not invisible; they are visible in a particular manner and they are active participants in producing that visibility. We argue that for veiled women, the clothed body is the site of a project to map an ideal of harmony that has both aesthetic and ethical registers. This ideal of a unified, harmonious appearance (which, we will suggest, exists somewhere between the psychoanalytic ego ideal and an Islamic ideal of the self) is ruptured by materialist and corporeal desire, what women call nefis. Veiling‐fashion, we argue, both incites nefis/desire and works as a means of governing it.

Speaker Bios

Asu Aksoy, Department of Cultural Management, Department of Communications; Director, Cultural Policy and Management Research Center, Bilgi University, Istanbul

Tolga İslam, Urban Planning, Yildiz Teknik University, Istanbul

As a researcher, Tolga İslam has been working on gentrification for the past 10 years, mainly focusing on the gentrification processes taking place in Istanbul. He has written his PhD thesis on state-led / urban renewal based gentrification in a Roman neighborhood, Sulukule / Istanbul (2009), and master thesis on (classical) gentrification and gentrifiers in Galata / Istanbul (2003). He has published a number of articles on gentrification, urban renewal and urban discourse. He is currently working as an assoc. prof. at the Urban Planning Department of Yildiz Technical University (for more info: tolgaislam.com).

Amy Mills, Geography, University of South Carolina

Amy Mills is an urban cultural geographer with a master’s degree in Middle East Studies and a doctorate in Geography from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research lies at the intersections of critical human geography and interdisciplinary Middle Eastern studies. Her book, Streets of Memory: Landscape, Tolerance, and National Identity in Istanbul (University of Georgia Press, 2010) was the winner of the 2011 Jane Jacobs Urban Communication Foundation Book Award. Her new project on satire, urbanism, and Istanbulite nationalism is supported by a Josephine Abney Fellowship in Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of South Carolina and the American Research Institute in Turkey. Dr. Mills also has a research interest in the production of geographic knowledge and has collaborated with the Social Science Research Council on a project on disciplinarity and Middle East studies. Dr. Mills has held leadership positions in the Turkish Studies Association, and the Middle East/North Africa and Political Geography Specialty Groups of the Association of American Geographers. Her research has been funded by various sources, including the Institute of Turkish Studies and the Fulbright-Hays Foundation. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina.

Derya Özkan, Institute of European Ethnology, University of Munich

Derya Özkan studied Architecture, Sociology and worked as a professional editor of journals on architecture and urban culture, before she went back to academia to pursue a Ph.D. In 2008, she completed a dissertation titled “The Misuse Value of Space: Spatial Practices and the Production of Space in Istanbul” and received her Ph.D. degree in Visual and Cultural Studies from the University of Rochester. She joined the Institute of European Ethnology at the University of Munich in 2008 as a Postdoctoral Fellow. Since 2011, she has been holding a DFG Emmy Noether Fellowship and leading the Research Project “Changing Imaginations of Istanbul. From Oriental to the ‘Cool’ City.” Her research interests are situated at the intersection points of urban studies, cultural studies and migration studies.

Anna Secor, Geography, University of Kentucky

Anna J. Secor is Professor of Geography at the University of Kentucky. Her research focuses on theories of space, politics, and subjectivity. She is author of over thirty articles and book chapters that have appeared in journals such as Area, Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Antipode, Environment and Planning A, Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, Gender, Place and Culture, Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, Political Geography, Review of International Political Economy, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, and Urban Geography. Her research on Islam, state, and society in Turkey has been funded by the National Science Foundation. Her most recent work in Turkey is a collaborative NSF-funded project with Banu Gokariksel (UNC) on the production and consumption of Islamic fashions in Turkey.

Mahir Şaul, Anthropology, University of Illinois

Mahir Şaul spans in his research two world areas, Africa and the Middle East; thematically he carried out work on household organization, economic and political history, the transnational movement of people and ideas, and language and visual arts in their social context. His current project concerns south-south migration, based on a year of fieldwork among West and Central African immigrants in Istanbul. At the same time he publishes on African cinema and on his earlier research in West Africa. He carried out most of his fieldwork in Burkina Faso, with three separately funded extended periods of residence, and a large number of shorter study visits. Questions about intra-household relations, agricultural work schedules, and gender roles informed these research episodes. During his second stay in 1983 he began his long-term engagement with Bobo-speaking villages, continuing his earlier focus on farm organization, but extending it now to community ritual calendar and masquerades. His approach gradually took a more pronounced historical turn. He spent time in the colonial archives in France, Côte d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso, and the archives of the White Father missionaries in Rome. He published an anthropological history of a violent African resistance movement in the early colonial period, and essays on the polycephalous political order of the late nineteenth century Volta region, economic history, older moneys and transition to colonial currency. He participated in a large multi-country project on environmental history, collaborating for the purpose with Burkinabe colleagues. He followed work on rural, urban, and cross-border trade with surveys on the same topic in Mali, Senegal, Benin, Togo, and Ghana. His current sub-Saharan immigrants research builds on this background; it foregrounds trade connections, self-employment, and aspirations for self-betterment as against prevailing themes in the literature, such as helplessness, precarious existence, and transitory movements. The second world area where Şaul conducts research is Turkey in its Middle Eastern and European settings. He wrote on Judeo-Spanish sociolinguistics, has an abiding interest in Turkish oral literature and folklore, and gave lectures on Turkish nationalism and modernization process. He held teaching and research positions in various European institutions. On the heels of an African film festival in Urbana, Illinois, he curated in 2012 a high profile African film series for the Istanbul Museum of Modern Art in Turkey. He teaches on anthropological social theory and Marxism, economic anthropology, transnational migrations, Islam, African cinema, African ethnography, and Sephardic culture.

Previous Years’ Symposium

2012

EU Studies Conference October 2015

“Researching and Teaching the EU: Best Practices and Current Trends in EU Scholarship”
A Working Conference for Regional College Faculty

October 30-31, 2015

 

Conference location and hotel:
Illini Union Hotel, 1401 West Green St., Urbana, IL 61801.
Conference sessions will be held at the Illini Union, 1401 West Green St., Urbana, IL 61801.

 

Online registration is closed.
Presentations on any topic relevant to EU studies are welcome.
Colleagues with only a nascent academic interest in the EU are invited to join us without being obliged to present any materials.

 

Graduate students are welcome. We can also consider participation by graduate students. Pending availability, travel support may be possible for graduate students whose abstracts are accepted for presentation.

 

Registration fee: Participants who are not presenting are required to pay a $50 registration fee. This fee will be waived for accepted speakers and University of Illinois faculty and graduate students. A $100 travel reimbursement grant and one night of free lodging will be available to all participants.

 

Note about lodging: The EU Center has reserved a block of rooms at the Illini Union Hotel and will provide one night of free lodging on October 30, 2015. We can also provide overnight accommodation for an extra day if you need it. Please see the link to the registration form above for details. Please note that you do NOT need to contact the hotel; simply indicate whether you will need overnight accommodations or not and for which dates when you register on-line.
The Illini Union Hotel has free parking available. Free wireless access is available in guest rooms and conference room.

 

About the Conference

This annual conference will bring together regional college faculty with the aim of increasing research on and teaching of the European Union at universities and four-year and two-year colleges in Illinois and the Midwest. It will facilitate the building of a dynamic network for regional educators with interests in EU studies. The conference will include panel discussions in which participants can present their research on the EU, as well as sessions on effective teaching of EU-related subjects.

rfwc2103_group

Why Attend?

  • Hear timely discussions on contemporary European and transatlantic affairs by prominent scholars and diplomats
  • Great networking opportunity
  • Strategize for teaching the EU
  • Discuss research/teaching interests with colleagues
  • Engage in discussions on EU studies as a field
  • One-night of free accommodations at the Illini Union Hotel on UI’s Champaign-Urbana campus
  • Travel reimbursement grant of up to $100 available for participating faculty

Schedule [pdf] and Abstracts [pdf]

 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30

Location: Illini Union, Room 407, 1401 West Green St., Urbana, IL 61801

3:00-4:30 pm

Roundtable Discussion: Testing the limits of the EU-Greece, the economy and refugee crises

Link to videorecording

Speakers:
Stefanos Katsikas, Director of Modern Greek Studies, School of Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics (SLCL), University of Illinois
Benjamin Lough, Social Work, University of Illinois
Michael McGowan, Former Member of the European Parliament and British Journalist
Kolja Raube, Visiting Scholar, European Union Center, University of Illinois; Centre for European Studies, Centre for Global Governance Studies, KU-Leuven
Marina Terkourafi, Linguistics, University of Illinois
Moderator: Anna Westerstahl Stenport, Director of the European Union Center, Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Illiniois

4:30 – 6:00 pm

4:30-6:00pm: Reception

Location: Illini Union Room 406,1401 West Green St., Urbana, IL 61801.

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31
8:00 am – 4:00pm:

“Researching and Teaching the EU: Best Practices and Current Trends in EU Scholarship: A Working Conference for Regional College Faculty”

Location: General Lounge, Illini Union Room 210, 1401 West Green St., Urbana, IL 61801.

8:00 – 8:30 am

Coffee/tea and pastries

8:30 – 9:45 am

Panel 1: Impact and Effectiveness of EU Institutions and Policy Instruments (Part I – Economy)

“Will Juncker’s Investment Plan Work?”
David Cleeton, Economics, Illinois State University

Link to pdf

“Regional Financial Inequality in Turkey: 1988-2013 – Does EU the make a difference?”
Serpil Kahraman, Visiting Scholar, Economics, University of Illinois; Yasar University, Turkey

“The EU through the lenses of its poorest member state – evidence from Bulgaria”
Paskal Zhelev, Visiting Scholar, Economics, University of Illinois; International Economic Relations and Business, University of National and World Economy (UNWE), Bulgaria

Link to PowerPoint 

9:45 – 10:00
Break
10:00 am-11:15 am

Panel 2: Impact and Effectiveness of EU Policies (Part II – Labor, Environment, and Society)

“A Proposal of Social Clause on TTIP
Juan Ramon Rivera Sanchez Visiting Scholar, EUC, University of Illinois; Law, Alicante University, Spain

Link to Prezi

“A New Water Culture on the Iberian Peninsula? Evaluating Epistemic Community Impact on Policy Change”
Jeanie Bukowski, International Studies, Bradley University

Link to PowerPoint

“Female Bodies for Sale: Regulating the Advertising Industry and Its Portrayals of Women in Bulgaria”
Elza Ibroscheva, Mass Communications, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Link to PowerPoint

11:15-11:30 am

Break

11:30 am-1:15 pm

Keynote Address and Lunch
Keynote Speaker: Michael McGowan, Former Member of the European Parliament and British Journalist

11:15-11:30 AM
1:15-2:30 pm

Panel 3: EU Governance and EU As a Global Actor

“Party Group Switching in the European Parliament: Developing a Multi-level Theory”
Aaron Russell Martin, Political Science, Loyola University Chicago
Link to PowerPoint

“Interparliamentary Cooperation in EU External Action”
Kolja Raube, Visiting Scholar, Economics, University of Illinois; Centre for European Studies, KU-Leuven, Belgium
Link to PowerPoint

“Doing Global Research on Perception: The Misunderstood Partner”
Maxime H.A. Larivé, EU Center, University of Illinois

Link to PowerPoint

2:30-2:45 pm
Break
2:45-3:45 pm
Roundtable Discussion: “Strategies for Teaching the EU”

“A Course Project on the European Union and the Question of Turkey
Marjorie Nanian, Political Science
Link to Syllabi
Link to Outline
Link to Exam Requirements

“Die Politik und Kultur der Europäischen Union
Sommersemester 2015”

Professor Bruce Murray,
Link to Syllabi

“European Integration”
Jeanie Bukowski, Institute of International Studies, Bradley University
Link to Syllabi
Link to Assignment

“Financial Market Reform In the European Union”
David Cleeton,Maastricht University
Link to Syllabi

“Internal Market of the European Union”
Paskal Zhelev, Visiting Scholar, Economics, University of Illinois; International Economic Relations and Business, University of National and World Economy (UNWE), Bulgaria
Link to Syllabi

“Legal Protections for Natural Areas”
Adjunct Professor Warren Lavey
Link to Syllabi

“Peoples & Cultures of Europe”
Angela Glaros,Eastern Illinois University
Link to Syllabi

3:45-4:00 pm
Closing Remarks

 

Previous Conferences

March 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009

 

The roundtable and the conference are funded in part by a US Department of Education Title VI grant and a Getting to Know Europe Grant from the European Commission to the European Union Center, University of Illinois.

Generous support for Mr. Michael McGowan’s visit is provided by the European Parliament Former Members Association through its “EP to Campus” programme, which is in part sponsored by CANDRIAM.

Logo EP to CampusCANDRIAM_DESCRIPTOR_PROTECTION_DEF_CMYK_600PX

11th Annual Turkish Studies Symposium

Turkey in the Aftermath of the Failed Coup Attempt

 

April 4, 2017

1:30 – 4:30 pm

Reception to follow

 

Levis Faculty Center
4th Floor
919 W Illinois St
[map]

 

Organized by:

Women and Gender in Global Perspectives Program

Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center

European Union Center

*

Co-sponsored by:

Center for Global Studies

Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities

*

EUC, REEEC, and CGS are National Resource Centers funded by the US Department of Education Title VI grant. EUC is also a Jean Monnet Center of Excellence funded by the European Union. CSAMES is partially funded by the US Department of Education Title VIa grant. This symposium is supported by funding from the US Department of Education Title VI grant.

*

Symposium poster [click the image to enlarge]
For the PDF version of the poster, please click here.


SCHEDULE

 

1:30 – 1:35 pm            Welcoming Remarks
Colleen Murphy, Director, Women and Gender in Global Perspectives Program (WGGP); Professor of Law and Philosophy, University of Illinois

 

1:35 – 2:15 pm            Turkey-EU Relations After the Failed Coup Attempt

Karol Kujawa, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public Administration, Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkey; Kosciuszko Senior Scholar, University of Illinois

 

2:15 – 2:55 pm             Has Turkey’s failed coup actually succeeded?

Mustafa Akyol, Turkish journalist and author; columnist for Al-Monitor; monthly contributing opinion writer for The New York Times; Senior Fellow at Freedom Project at Wellesley College

 

2:55 – 3:00 pm            Break

 

3:00 – 3:40 pm            What changed for women after Turkey’s failed coup attempt?

Riada Asimovic Akyol, PhD candidate at Galatasaray University in Istanbul; contributing writer for Al-Monitor

 

3:40 – 4:20 pm           The Challenge of Listening after the Attempted Coup

Denise Elif Gill, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, Washington University in St. Louis

 

4:20 pm                        Concluding remarks


ABSTRACTS (in order of presentation):

 

Turkey-EU Relations After the Failed Coup Attempt” 

Karol Kujawa, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public Administration, Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkey; Kosciuszko Senior Scholar, University of Illinois

 

For over half a century Turkey has been striving to become an EU member. Nonetheless, the problem of serious democratic reforms which would bring Turkey closer to the Community was first taken up by an Islamic party AKP. In the first years of his government (2002-2007) in particular, a lot of democratic reforms in Turkey were carried out. Yet, in the recent years the process of the implementation of democratic reforms has weakened. Especially after they failed the coup attempt, Turkish-European relations found themselves on the verge of collapse. Despite the declarations neither party does not believe in the ability to break the deadlock. The weakness as well as the limited scope of the EU-Turkish political dialogue resulted in a number of practical problems. Ultimately, negotiations found themselves in a vacuum and are close to breaking. However, both of sides need each other. The interruption of the integration process with Turkey could have very negative consequences for both sides: for Turkey could lead to economic crisis, while for EU could lead to increase in the threat of terrorism and the outbreak of another migration crisis. How we can overcome this deadlock, and how we can re-initiate the process of integration of Turkey with EU? 

 

Has Turkey’s failed coup actually succeeded?

Mustafa Akyol, Turkish journalist and author; columnist for Al-Monitor; monthly contributing opinion writer for The New York Times; Senior Fellow at Freedom Project at Wellesley College

 

On July 15, 2016, Turkey had one of the longest and bloodiest nights in its his history. A faction within the military launched a coup attempt, met with popular resistance, and ultimately failed. It was, for sure, a victory for democracy, since a democratically elected government has been saved from a military intervention. However, it took no time for the same government to initiate a nation-wide purge which targeted not just the putschists but also mere outspoken critics. Turkey’s “state of emergency,” in fact, has gradually proved as authoritarian as a military regime would probably be. Why Turkey, once a “model” of Muslim democracy, came to this point? And where it is heading? What does the April 16 referendum on a major constitutional amendment mean? Mustafa Akyol, Turkish journalist and author, will offer his observations

 

What changed for women after Turkey’s failed coup attempt?

Riada Asimovic Akyol, PhD candidate at Galatasaray University in Istanbul; contributing writer for Al-Monitor

 

On July 15, the Turks who bravely resisted against the military coup attempt included many women — some who gave their lives heroically to resist tanks and guns. They are now commemorated in Turkey, especially among the supporters of the government, as the “female martyrs” of Turkish democracy.

This is just one scene from the complexity of women’s reality in Turkey. Politics defines everything, including women. Pro-government women, most of whom are religious conservatives, feel empowered. They seem happy to have ended the dark days of “Old Turkey,” where the Islamic headscarf was banned in public institutions and thus made them feel like second class citizens. Meanwhile, other women, those in the opposition, think that their own “dark days” have begun and maybe the worst is yet to come. 

Besides politics, women’s real issues — such as domestic violence, glass ceilings, child brides, and more — remain, as attention and progress on those burning problems are very limited. There are only a handful of examples of concerted female effort to fight misogyny. Turks’ century-old political fight, sadly, overshadows almost everything else.       

 

The Challenge of Listening after the Attempted Coup

Denise Elif Gill, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, Washington University in St. Louis

 

The sounds of the failed coup of last July have had long-lasting effects on Turks in urban cities unaccustomed to the acoustics of war.  Religious devotional recitations—especially the ezan call to prayer and the sela prayer—melded within militaristic cacophony and, eventually, the chants of protesters.  In this talk, I will demonstrate how the vast intersections of sounds in the attempted coup resonate from and may resurrect pre-Republic modalities of listening in times of violence.  The coup attempt engendered new structures of listening elucidating—and challenging—Turkey’s longstanding polarization between state secularism and the public practices of Sunni Islam.  Whole spectrums of listeners are attuned in new ways to resonances in the public sphere, intimately aware of the efficacies of sound, voice, silence, and silencing.  Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Istanbul during 2016, I attend to the intersections, comingling, and contradictions of emergent structures of listening in the wake of the failed coup.


SPEAKER BIOS (in alphabetical order)

 

Mustafa Akyol is a Turkish journalist and author. He is a columnist for Al-Monitor: The Pulse of the Middle East, and a monthly contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. His articles have also appeared in Foreign Affairs, Newsweek, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian. He is the author of Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty (2011), and “The Islamic Jesus: How the King of the Jews Became a Prophet of the Muslims.” (2017).
Akyol is currently a Visiting Senior Fellow at the Freedom Project at Wellesley College.
His website: www.MustafaAkyol.org
His Twitter feed: @AkyolinEnglish

 

Riada Asimovic Akyol holds an undergraduate degree from Hamilton College in Clinton, NY, a graduate degree from University of Buckingham and is currently a PhD candidate at Galatasaray University in Istanbul. Her thesis focuses on religion and politics in the Balkans through a critical reading of the Huntingtonian perspective of “clash of civilizations”. Writing and speaking on women, particularly Muslim women, has been another of her great intellectual interests and passions. Hence, since 2013, she has written on topics related to Islam, Turkey and women as contributing writer for Al-Monitor.com: The Pulse of the Middle East. Her pieces were also published in The New York Times, The Nation, Al Jazeera English, and The National (based in Dubai). 

 

Denise Elif Gill is an ethnomusicologist whose work focuses on sonic practices of Turkey and the land and seas formally under Ottoman control. Her research—based on over four years of ethnographic research—is foundationally grounded in careful consideration of sound and listening in relation to intersectionality, gender and sexualities, Islam, Sufi orders (especially the Mevleviyye), health, ableism, memory, and social justice. Dr. Gill is a recipient of the Ki Mantle Hood Award (2007), two Fulbrights (2007-8, 2008-09), a Sakip Sabancı International Research Award (2008), and a fellowship from the American Council for Learned Societies (ACLS). Her first book, Melancholic Modalities: Affect, Islam, and Turkish Classical Musicians (Oxford, 2017), interrogates the melancholies intentionally cultivated by present-day musicians who champion, teach, and perform Ottoman-Turkish classical musics. Introducing new methodologies of rhizomatic analysis and bi-aurality, Dr. Gill studies how musicians deploy sonic, affective melancholies as reparative and pleasurable formations of morality.  Her current research projects examine the distinct listening structures of death, loss, and migratory thresholds. As a kanun (trapezoidal zither) player, Dr. Gill has performed on radio and television programs and in concert halls in Turkey, the United States, and in multiple cities in Europe.

 

Karol Kujawa is an analyst specializing in the Middle East, Balkans and European Neighbourhood Policy. He obtained his Ph.D. from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań. Prior to his doctoral work, he was a fellow at the Center for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Pittsburgh (USA), Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (France), University of Zagreb (Croatia), and Mersin University (Turkey). He used to work as a senior analyst on Turkey and the Balkans in the Polish Institute of International Affairs in Warsaw, a government think tank. He has been a lecturer at the European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Germany), Department of Asian Studies at Adam Mickiewicz University (Poland), and Gazikent University (Turkey). He has published more than 100 articles and has given numerous interviews for media. Currently, he is an assistant professor at the Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University and a Kosciuszko Foundation Fellow in the U.S. Since 2015 he serves as expert at the governmental research institution – National Science Agency in Poland. Kujawa is currently preparing a book-length study about Turkish-US relations.


Previous Years’ Symposiums

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012

Current Students

 

Victoria BauerVictoria Bauer is a first year MAEUS student. She received her B.A. in French and Francophone Studies at Illinois Wesleyan University. Victoria’s research interests include gender equality, the cultural barriers of the European Union (including language), and French and Francophone Civilizations. During her time at Illinois Wesleyan, she spent a semester abroad in Nantes, France in a language and cultural immersion program. She also completed an independent research project about the identity of the French woman defined by the Napoleonic Code. Victoria is also a FLAS fellow continuing to study higher level French for her eleventh year. In her spare time, Victoria reads francophone literature, plans to travel back to France (and several other destinations in Europe), and enjoys a variety of different foods.


Raphaela

Raphaela Berding received a Bachelor’s degree in Multilingual Communications with a focus on Translation and Interpreting from the University of Applied Sciences in Cologne, Germany in 2015. The languages that were included were of course German, but also English and Spanish. During her studies, she spent one semester studying abroad in the US at Parkland College in Champaign, Illinois. She worked on international trade fairs which got her aware of the globalized world and the importance of understanding the different institutions that play a role. She is very interested in different cultures of every kind and everything related to that, including language and customs for example. She wrote her Bachelor thesis about the situation of German women in Dubai. After high school graduation, She went on an eight months trip through Australia and also visited New Zealand, and some countries in South East Asia. She also travelled to certain countries in Europe, including Austria, Switzerland, Netherlands, Spain and Italy. There are still a lot of places she wants to visit. In her spare time, she love to read and is very sportive.


Katherine BrownKatherine Brown is a first year MAEUS student. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of Illinois in 2016. As an undergraduate, she specialized in terrorism, border security, and Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian affairs. She also had the privilege of working in the United States Senate for two years and has worked on both a Senate and US Presidential campaign. She plans to research EU-Russian affairs, extremist movements in Europe, and border security issues. In her spare time, Katherine likes to travel, watch the Chicago Blackhawks, and play with her four rescued dogs. She is also an experienced and avid figure skater.


digiulioCarlo Di Giulio is a second year MAEUS student. He graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Law and a Master’s Degree in IT Law and Legal Informatics at the University of Bologna, Italy. Since his graduation, Carlo has worked as a consultant for a major Italian company specialized in IT Trust Services, being involved in the design of dematerialization projects for the Italian Public Administration and private business companies in Italy, France, and Spain. During his professional development, Carlo has been involved in IT law compliance and digital identity issues from a national and European perspective. His research interest is in the European Digital Agenda, privacy, security, and information assurance. In his spare time, Carlo likes to explore new places, use his boxing gloves, play his ES-175 guitar, and make bread.


389128_10201173556039914_1555343508_nJack Driggs is a second year MAEUS student. He received his B.A. in Political Science and Economics while attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Jack’s research interests are focused around foreign policy, crises, and economic trends within the European Union. He aims to conduct research on the economic implications of the recent migrant crisis within the Eurozone. Outside of the Classroom Jack is a member of the Varsity Cross Country and Track and Field teams here at Illinois.

 

 


Bethany GlockBethany Glock is a second year MAEUS students. She received her bachelor’s degree in Political Science, International Studies, and Russian Studies from Saint Louis University in 2015. Her research interests include the relationship between the European Union and Russia, Polish history and politics, and the relationship between governments and religious institutions. For the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 academic years, Bethany was awarded the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship to study Polish. In her spare time, Bethany enjoys theology, working for LCMS U (the campus ministry network of the Lutheran Church— Missouri Synod), singing in choirs, volunteering, and drinking coffee.


 

Paula AgramonPaula Jaime Agramon is a second year MAEUS student. She has studied Marketing and Management at East Tennessee State University where she also got her Masters of Business Administration. Originally from Spain she came to the United States in 2008 with an athletic scholarship to play tennis at ETSU. She has worked as a manager at a tennis resort in Vermont for 5 summers. While pursuing her MBA she completed two internships working with social media marketing and developing and designing websites for local businesses. This past year Paula worked for a national insurance company as a Sales Representative and started working for the U of I in Illinois International as a Communications Assistant. She will also be working part time at the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research in the communications department. Paula is intending to apply for a Graduate Minor in Corporate Governance and International Business while completing her MAEUS track in Business, Economics and Finance. Paula speaks Spanish and Portuguese and will study German in the fall semester.


HDRtist HDR - http://www.ohanaware.com/hdrtist/

Marshall Janevicius is a first year MAEUS student. He received his B.S. in Advertising and B.A. in French Commercial Studies – Business Administration at the University of Illinois in 2016. During the spring of 2014, Marshall studied at l’Institut Catholique de Paris for a semester where he completed a research project on the social and technological transformation in Parisian metro advertisements. For his undergraduate thesis, Marshall wrote and presented a project on the 2015 Syrian refugee crisis related to the legal obligations of the European Union. Along with immigration and refugee issues, Marshall is also interested in European education policy. Marshall will continue his French studies in graduate school and begin his Arabic language studies during the fall semester. In his spare time, Marshall enjoys performing in multiple bands and competing in triathlon races.


Barbara Myers updated profile photoBarbara Myers is in her final year of the MAEUS program. Before graduate school, she completed her BA at the Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism, and went on to earn a post-baccalaureate certificate in Creative Writing (Fiction) from NU. Barbara is a published fiction and freelance writer, and she does Swedish>English and Spanish>English literary translation. Her research interests include multilingualism, RIM languages, multiculturalism, and integration spaces. In addition to reading, writing, and practicing languages, Barbara enjoys singing, traveling, playing the cello, and drinking a good cup of coffee, cider, or Belgian ale.


Ozburn pic with EU flagLindsay Ozburn is a third year MAEUS student. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Music History with a minor in African Studies from the University of Illinois in 2012. As an undergraduate, she specialized in ethnomusicology, studying Arab and Balkan music, Guinean Mande drumming, and Ghanaian Ewe drumming. Her current research includes Greek and EU asylum policy and area studies librarianship. In the Fall of 2016, she will begin a second Master’s degree in Library Science, combining her passion for area studies, foreign languages, and libraries to focus on a career in Area Studies and Academic Librarianship. Lindsay has held FLAS Fellowships with the European Union Center since 2014, studying Modern Greek up until Spring 2016 and Turkish through Spring 2017. She served as a Graduate Assistant to the European Union Center for 1 ½ years, and now works for the International & Area Studies Library and Center for Global Studies as their Library Graduate Assistant. In her spare time, Lindsay enjoys cooking, swimming, watching Jane Austen movies, traveling, her cats, jam sessions, and playing a good video game.


Rafael RodriguezRafael Rodriguez is a first year MAEUS student from Colombia with a Bachelor’s Degree in Education of Foreign Language Teaching. During his studies, he had the opportunity to participate in several work and summer camp exchange programs in the United States. After being a teacher of English and French for two years in several K-12 schools in Colombia, once he graduated in 2010, he was hired by the same company that ran the exchange programs in which he participated. In three years he went from interviewer of new applicants to Director of the Sports Exchange Programs. Later in 2014 he came to Champaign and obtained a certificate in International Business Management at Parkland College where he was awarded with two scholarships and graduated with honors. Using the Optional Practical Training offered to international students, he worked for one year with one of the major leasing companies in Champaign-Urbana, managing the public relations with the student organizations at UIUC. He is very interested in doing research about the political and cultural relations between the European Union and Colombia and how these relations could be boosted now that peace has been signed after several years of civil war.


schwenkAndrew Schwenk is in his second year of the MAEUS program. Before graduate school, he also attended the University of Illinois for his BA, which he earned in the Fall of 2014 in German and Anthropology. He combined these two topics in his Anthropology Capstone project, which focused on the history of the far-right in Germany and Austria since the end of WWII. During his undergraduate studies, Andrew also enjoyed a semester abroad in Vienna, Austria. His research interests include language policy, regional and European identity, the far-right, and the relationship between Northern and Southern Europe. This fall, he will begin writing his thesis on the relationship between the European Union and revitalization of Low German in northern Germany. In his spare time, Andrew likes to practice foreign languages, read about the history and culture of Europe and Japan, and play various musical instruments.

March 2015 Regional Faculty Conference

“Researching and Teaching the EU: Best Practices and Current Trends in EU Scholarship”
A Working Conference for Regional College Faculty

March 12-13, 2015

 

Keynote speaker: Prof. Stefan Jonsson, Linköping University.
Prof. Jonsson’s keynote lecture will be based on the new book that he just published with Peo Hansen on “Eurafrica: The Untold History of European Integration and Colonialism” and address the landscape and future of European Studies and EU studies as such.

 

Conference location and hotel: I-Hotel, 1900 S. First Street, Champaign, Illinois 61820. Conference sessions will be held in the Humanities Room.

 

Registration for the 2015 Regional Faculty Conference is now closed.

 

Presentations on any topic relevant to EU studies are welcome.
Colleagues with only a nascent academic interest in the EU are invited to join us without being obliged to present any materials.

 

Graduate students are welcome. We can also consider participation by graduate students. Pending availability, travel support may be possible for graduate students whose abstracts are accepted for presentation.

 

Registration fee: Participants who are not presenting are required to pay a $50 registration fee. This fee will be waived for accepted speakers. A $100 travel reimbursement grant and two nights of free lodging will be available to all participants.

 

Note about lodging: The EU Center has reserved a block of rooms at I-Hotel and will provide two nights of free lodging on March 11 & 12, 2015. We can also provide overnight accommodation for an extra day if you need it. Please see the link to the registration form above for details. Please note that you do NOT need to contact the hotel; simply indicate whether you will need overnight accommodations or not and for which dates when you register on-line.

 

Additional Attractions and Unique Opportunities This Year:

Come early
for the EUC’s Annual EU Day (Thursday, March 12th, 10 am – 2 pm)

featuring “State of the EU” keynote address by Andris Razāns, Latvian Ambassador to the U.S., followed by a reception and luncheon. We encourage you to join us for the EU Day festivities! For more information about the EU Day and to see our promotional EU Day video, click here.

 

Stay longer
for the keynote address, “The Mediterranean: A Cradle of Civilizations amongst Others” by Zeev Gourarier
(Director of Science and Collections, Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilizations in Marseille, France) on March 13th at 5 pm as part of the Graduate Student Colloquium “(Un)mapping the Mediterranean, which is being held on March 14th at 9:30 am. More information about the colloquium is available online.

For more information, click here.

 

Join us
for the Chai Wai at the Library: “The Future of the European Union: A Shared Vision?”, a roundtable with members of the Chicago Consular Corps on Thursday, March 12 from 2:30 – 4:00 pm.

 

Logistical information is available as a PDF, including a map of the key locations.

 

About the Conference

This annual conference will bring together regional college faculty with the aim of increasing research on and teaching of the European Union at universities and four-year and two-year colleges in Illinois and the Midwest. It will facilitate the building of a dynamic network for regional educators with interests in EU studies. The conference will include panel discussions in which participants can present their research on the EU, as well as sessions on effective teaching of EU-related subjects.

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Why Attend?

  • Hear keynote speeches by prominent scholars and diplomats
  • Great networking opportunity
  • Strategize for teaching the EU
  • Discuss research/teaching interests with colleagues
  • Engage in discussions on EU studies as a field
  • Two-nights of free accommodations at the I-Hotel on UI’s Champaign-Urbana campus
  • Travel reimbursement grant of up to $100 available for participating faculty

Schedule [.pdf] and Abstracts [.pdf]

Thursday, March 12

EU Day with Andris Razāns, Ambassador of Latvia to the U.S.
Location: Alice Campbell Alumni Center Ballroom, 601 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana, IL 61801

10:00 – 11:30 am

“State of the EU” Address, followed by reception

12:30 – 2:00 pm

Ambassador’s Luncheon

Conference Welcome Dinner and Keynote Address
Location: I-Hotel (Humanities Room), 1900 S. First Street, Champaign, IL 61820

5:30 – 5:45 pm

Check-in

5:45 pm

Welcome Remarks
Anna Stenport, Director, European Union Center, University of Illinois

6:00 pm
Prof. Stefan Jonsson, Linköping University.
Prof. Jonsson’s keynote lecture will be based on the new book that he just published with Peo Hansen on “Eurafrica: The Untold History of European Integration and Colonialism” and address the landscape and future of European Studies and EU studies as such.

Friday, March 13

“Researching and Teaching the EU: Best Practices and Current Trends in EU Scholarship: A Working Conference for Regional College Faculty”
Location: I-Hotel (Humanities Room), 1900 S. First Street, Champaign, IL 61820

8:00 – 8:30 am

Coffee/tea and pastries

8:30 – 10:45 am

Panel 1: Impact and Effectiveness of EU Institutions and Legal Policy Instruments

“Effective European Antitrust: Does EU Merger Policy Involve Deterrence”
Joseph A. Clougherty, Business Administration, University of Illinois

“Multinational Banking and the Conflicts Among US and EU AML/CTF Reporting and Data Protection Law”
Michelle Frasher, Political Science, Rutgers University-Newark; EU Center Visiting Scholar, University of Illinois

“Past and Present Efforts to Green the Common Agricultural Policy: Successes, Failures, and Future Potential for Multifunction Landscape Design”
Rayane Oliveira de Aguiar, EU Studies, University of Illinois

“EU and Trafficking in Human Beings: Which Legal Framework When Victims Are EU Citizens?”
Marco Borraccetti, European Union Law of the Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, School of Political Science; EU Center Visiting Scholar, University of Illinois

“The Committee of the Regions of the European Union: Its Role in Enhancing Local Democracy”
Petia Kostadinova, Political Science, University of Illinois at Chicago

Moderator: Anna Stenport, European Union Center, University of Illinois

10:45 – 11:00
Break
11:00 am – 12:15 pm

Panel 2: European Identities in the Making

“Speakers Attitudes vs. Institutional Acknowledgment: The Cases of Arbresh and Arvanitika Between Ideologies of Pride and Contempt”
Eda Derhemi, Department of French and Italian, University of Illinois

“Little Local Murders? Investigating Regional Identities in German and Scandinavian Crime Fiction”
Dustin L. Smith, Germanic Languages & Literatures, University of Illinois

“The Long and Winding Road…: Turkish Candidacy and the Process of Europeanization”
Joyce Marie Mushaben, Political Science, University of Missouri-St. Louis

Moderator: Matt Rosenstein, European Union Center, University of Illinois

12:15 – 2:30 pm
Working Lunch
Roundtable DIscussions: “(Re)thinking and (Re)defining EU Studies” and “Strategies for Teaching the EU”
2:30 – 4:15 pm

Panel 3: EU As a Global Actor

“EULEX KOSOVO: The EU and Rule of Law in Post-War Kosovo”
Christopher Jackson, EU Studies, University of Illinois

“The Diffusion of Human Rights Norms and Practices in the European Neighborhood”
Kostas Kourtikakis, Political Science, University of Illinois

“Effective Practices of International Volunteers in Disaster Relief: Implications for the EU Aid Volunteers Program”
Benjamin Lough and Tara Powell, Social Work, University of Illinois

Moderator: Sebnem Ozkan, European Union Center, University of Illinois

4:15 – 4:30 pm
Closing remarks and evaluations of conference

 

The conference is funded in part by a US Department of Education Title VI grant and a European Union Center of Excellence grant from the European Commission to the European Union Center, University of Illinois.

 

Previous Years’ Regional Faculty Working Conferences

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009